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Multicenter Study
. 2017 Oct 12;72(11):1525-1531.
doi: 10.1093/gerona/glx031.

Low Normalized Grip Strength Is a Biomarker for Cardiometabolic Disease and Physical Disabilities Among U.S. And Chinese Adults

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Multicenter Study

Low Normalized Grip Strength Is a Biomarker for Cardiometabolic Disease and Physical Disabilities Among U.S. And Chinese Adults

Mark D Peterson et al. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Background: Evidence highlights the importance of muscular strength as a protective factor for health and function across aging populations. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which low normalized grip strength (NGS) serves as a biomarker for both cardiometabolic disease and physical disability in U.S. and Chinese adults.

Methods: Middle aged and older adults from the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011-2012 and 2013-2014 combined surveys (n = 4,544), and the 2011 wave of the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (n = 6,030) were included. Strength was assessed using a handgrip dynamometer, and was normalized to body mass. Weighted logistic regression models were used to assess the association between NGS and diabetes, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL-cholesterol, hypertension, and physical disability status, while controlling for age, sex, and sociodemographic characteristics.

Results: Every 0.05 lower NGS was independently associated with a 1.49 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.42-1.56) and 1.17 (95% CI: 1.11-1.23) odds for diabetes; a 1.46 (95% CI: 1.39-1.53) and 1.11 (95% CI: 1.07-1.15) odds of hyperglycemia; a 1.15 (95% CI: 1.07-1.25) and 1.11 (95% CI: 1.08-1.14) odds of hypertriglyceridemia; a 1.22 (95% CI: 1.17-1.27) and 1.15 (95% CI: 1.12-1.18) odds of low HDL-cholesterol; a 1.19 (95% CI: 1.14-1.24) and 1.10 (95% CI: 1.07-1.14) odds of hypertension; and a 1.36 (95% CI: 1.29-1.42) and 1.10 (95% CI: 1.05-1.15) odds for physical disability status in U.S. and Chinese adults, respectively.

Conclusions: NGS was robustly associated with both cardiometabolic disease risk and physical disabilities in U.S. and Chinese aging adults.

Keywords: Aging; Diabetes; Disability; Epidemiology; Muscle weakness.

Figures

Figure 1.
Figure 1.
Absolute (a) and normalized (b) grip strength for U.S. and Chinese adults.

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