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, 6 (2), 141

Biodegradation of Butyronitrile and Demonstration of Its Mineralization by Rhodococcus Sp. MTB5

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Biodegradation of Butyronitrile and Demonstration of Its Mineralization by Rhodococcus Sp. MTB5

Ismailsab Mukram et al. 3 Biotech.

Abstract

A nitrile utilizing bacterium Rhodococcus sp. MTB5 was previously isolated in our laboratory by the enrichment culture technique. It is able to utilize butyronitrile as sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. Maximum butyronitrile degrading property of this strain has been investigated. Results reveal that 100, 98, and 88 % degradation was achieved for 2, 2.5, and 3 % butyronitrile, respectively. The strain is capable of growing in as high as 5 % butyronitrile concentration. A two-step pathway involving nitrile hydratase (NHase) and amidase was observed for the biodegradation of butyronitrile. Complete degradation (mineralization) of butyronitrile with the help of metabolite feeding experiment was reported. The significance of this investigation was the capability of the strain to completely degrade and its ability to grow on higher concentrations of butyronitrile. These potential features make it a suitable candidate for practical field application for effective in situ bioremediation of butyronitrile contaminated sites.

Keywords: Butyronitrile; Complete degradation; Metabolite feeding; Rhodococcus sp. MTB5.

Conflict of interest statement

Author declares no conflict of interest.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
General catabolic pathways (NHase: amidase and nitrilase) for degradation of organic nitriles
Fig. 2
Fig. 2
Growth of Rhodococcus sp. MTB5 and degradation of 2 % (a), 2.5 % (b) and 3 % (c) butyronitrile. Growth (filled squares); butyronitrile (dashed columns)
Fig. 3
Fig. 3
Amount of ammonia (open squares) released and  % degradation (filled squares) of 2, 2.5, and 3 % butyronitrile by Rhodococcus sp. MTB5
Fig. 4
Fig. 4
Growth of Rhodococcus sp. MTB5 on metabolites, butyramide, and butyric acid, and their utilization. Growth on butyramide (open squares) and butyric acid (filled squares); utilization of butyramide (open triangles) and butyric acid (filled triangles)
Fig. 5
Fig. 5
Catabolic pathway of butyronitrile in Rhodococcus sp. strain MTB5
Fig. 6
Fig. 6
Growth of Rhodococcus sp. MTB5 on increasing concentrations of butyronitrile: 3.5 % (filled squares), 4 % (open squares), 4.5 % (filled triangles), 5 % (open triangles) and 5.5 % (filled circles)

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