Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Filters applied. Clear all
. 2016 Oct 18;6(10):188.
doi: 10.3390/nano6100188.

Polymer Nanocomposite Film With Metal Rich Surface Prepared by In Situ Single-Step Formation of Palladium Nanoparticles: An Interesting Way to Combine Specific Functional Properties

Affiliations
Free PMC article

Polymer Nanocomposite Film With Metal Rich Surface Prepared by In Situ Single-Step Formation of Palladium Nanoparticles: An Interesting Way to Combine Specific Functional Properties

David Thompson et al. Nanomaterials (Basel). .
Free PMC article

Abstract

This paper presents a continuous single-step route that permits preparation of a thermostable polymer/metal nanocomposite film and to combine different functional properties in a unique material. More precisely, palladium nanoparticles are in situ generated in a polyimide matrix thanks to a designed curing cycle which is applied to a polyamic acid/metal precursor solution cast on a glass plate. A metal-rich surface layer which is strongly bonded to the bulk film is formed in addition to homogeneously dispersed metal nanoparticles. This specific morphology leads to obtaining an optically reflective film. The metal nanoparticles act as gas diffusion barriers for helium, oxygen, and carbon dioxide; they induce a tortuosity effect which allows dividing the gas permeation coefficients by a factor near to 2 with respect to the neat polyimide matrix. Moreover, the ability of the in situ synthesized palladium nanoparticles to entrap hydrogen is evidenced. The nanocomposite film properties can be modulated as a function of the location of the film metal-rich surface with respect to the hydrogen feed. The synthesized nanocomposite could represent a major interest for a wide variety of applications, from specific coatings for aerospace or automotive industry, to catalysis applications or sensors.

Keywords: gas barrier material; hydrogen trap material; metal nanoparticles; optical properties; polyimide films.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Observation of the studied films at the macroscale: (a) neat polyimide film; (b) nanocomposite film surface formed in contact with air; and (c) nanocomposite film surface formed in contact with the glass plate.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image of the cross section of the nanocomposite film (scale bar: 200 nm).
Figure 3
Figure 3
X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of the nanocomposite film: the diffraction rays of the metal nanoparticles are pointed and identified in the XRD pattern.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Typical gas permeation curves observed for the neat polymer film.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Schematic representation of the hydrogen permeation curves obtained for the neat polymer film (dotted line) and the nanocomposite sample (continuous line). The permeation curves of the nanocomposite are represented for two configurations: case A: the metal-rich surface is placed at the upstream side in the cell- case A’: the metal-rich surface is placed at the downstream side in the cell.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

References

    1. Thomas V., Namdeo M., Mohan Y.M., Bajpai S.K., Bajpai M. Review on polymer, hydrogel and microgel metal nanocomposites: A facile nanotechnological approach. J. Macromol. Sci. Part A. 2008;45:107–119. doi: 10.1080/10601320701683470. - DOI
    1. Radhakrishnan T.P. Polymer-metal nanocomposite thin films: In situ fabrication and applications. Solid States Phys. 2012;1447:21–23.
    1. Coiai S., Passaglia E., Pucci A., Ruggeri G. Nanocomposites based on thermoplastic polymers and functional nanofiller for sensor applications. Materials. 2015;8:3377–3427. doi: 10.3390/ma8063377. - DOI
    1. Palza H. Antimicrobial polymers with metal nanoparticles. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015;16:2099–2116. doi: 10.3390/ijms16012099. - DOI - PMC - PubMed
    1. Petrucci G., Oberhauser W., Bartoli M., Giachi G., Frediani M., Passglia E., Capozzoli L., Rosi L. Pd-nanoparticles supported onto functionalized poly(lactic acid)-based stereocomplexes for partial alkyne hydrogenation. Appl. Catal. A. 2014;469:132–138. doi: 10.1016/j.apcata.2013.09.053. - DOI
Feedback