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Review
. 2017 Jun 1;46(3):1029-1056.
doi: 10.1093/ije/dyw319.

Fruit and Vegetable Intake and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease, Total Cancer and All-Cause Mortality-A Systematic Review and Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies

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Free PMC article
Review

Fruit and Vegetable Intake and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease, Total Cancer and All-Cause Mortality-A Systematic Review and Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies

Dagfinn Aune et al. Int J Epidemiol. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Background: Questions remain about the strength and shape of the dose-response relationship between fruit and vegetable intake and risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer and mortality, and the effects of specific types of fruit and vegetables. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to clarify these associations.

Methods: PubMed and Embase were searched up to 29 September 2016. Prospective studies of fruit and vegetable intake and cardiovascular disease, total cancer and all-cause mortality were included. Summary relative risks (RRs) were calculated using a random effects model, and the mortality burden globally was estimated; 95 studies (142 publications) were included.

Results: For fruits and vegetables combined, the summary RR per 200 g/day was 0.92 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.90-0.94, I 2 = 0%, n = 15] for coronary heart disease, 0.84 (95% CI: 0.76-0.92, I 2 = 73%, n = 10) for stroke, 0.92 (95% CI: 0.90-0.95, I 2 = 31%, n = 13) for cardiovascular disease, 0.97 (95% CI: 0.95-0.99, I 2 = 49%, n = 12) for total cancer and 0.90 (95% CI: 0.87-0.93, I 2 = 83%, n = 15) for all-cause mortality. Similar associations were observed for fruits and vegetables separately. Reductions in risk were observed up to 800 g/day for all outcomes except cancer (600 g/day). Inverse associations were observed between the intake of apples and pears, citrus fruits, green leafy vegetables, cruciferous vegetables, and salads and cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality, and between the intake of green-yellow vegetables and cruciferous vegetables and total cancer risk. An estimated 5.6 and 7.8 million premature deaths worldwide in 2013 may be attributable to a fruit and vegetable intake below 500 and 800 g/day, respectively, if the observed associations are causal.

Conclusions: Fruit and vegetable intakes were associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer and all-cause mortality. These results support public health recommendations to increase fruit and vegetable intake for the prevention of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and premature mortality.

Keywords: Fruit and vegetables; all-cause mortality; cancer; cardiovascular disease; cohort; diet; global assessment; nutrition.

Figures

Figure 1.
Figure 1.
Flow-chart of study selection.
Figure 2.
Figure 2.
Fruits, vegetables and coronary heart disease, linear and nonlinear dose-response..
Figure 3.
Figure 3.
Fruits and vegetables and stroke, linear and nonlinear dose-response..
Figure 4.
Figure 4.
Fruits and vegetables and cardiovascular disease, linear and nonlinear dose-response..
Figure 5.
Figure 5.
Fruits and vegetables and total cancer, linear and nonlinear dose-response..
Figure 6.
Figure 6.
Fruits, vegetables and all-cause mortality, linear and nonlinear dose-response..

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