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. 2017 Apr 25;116(9):1229-1233.
doi: 10.1038/bjc.2017.81. Epub 2017 Mar 28.

Dependence of Cancer Risk From Environmental Exposures on Underlying Genetic Susceptibility: An Illustration With Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Breast Cancer

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Free PMC article

Dependence of Cancer Risk From Environmental Exposures on Underlying Genetic Susceptibility: An Illustration With Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Breast Cancer

Jing Shen et al. Br J Cancer. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Background: Most studies of environmental risk factors and breast cancer are conducted using average risk cohorts.

Methods: We examined the association between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-albumin adducts in bloods from baseline and breast cancer risk in a prospective nested case-control study (New York site of the BCFR, 80 cases and 156 controls). We estimated the 10-year absolute breast cancer risk by a risk model that uses pedigree information (BOADICEA) and evaluated whether the increased risk from PAH differed by absolute risk.

Results: Women with detectable levels of PAH had a twofold association with breast cancer risk (odds ratio (OR)=2.04; 95% CI=1.06-3.93) relative to women with non-detectable levels. The association increased with higher levels of PAH (⩾median) and by a higher level of absolute breast cancer risk (10-year risk ⩾3.4%: OR=4.09, 95% CI=1.38-12.13).

Conclusions: These results support that family-based cohorts can be an efficient way to examine gene-environment interactions.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Increase in breast cancer risk from PAH exposure by absolute risk of breast cancer as estimated by the BOADICEA, New York site of the BCFR. Results from a multivariable conditional logistic regression of breast cancer risk with the following covariates: centred PAH-albumin adducts, indicator variable for women with non-detectable levels, continuous BOADICEA score, interactions between BOADICEA and centred PAH-albumin adducts and indicator variable for women with non-detectable values, and further adjusted for age at blood draw, body mass index and smoking status. P-value for multiplicative interaction=0.09.

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