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, 11 (4), 512-519

Association of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) With Depressive Symptoms in the United States Population and Independent Predictors of Depressive Symptoms in an IBD Population: A NHANES Study

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Association of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) With Depressive Symptoms in the United States Population and Independent Predictors of Depressive Symptoms in an IBD Population: A NHANES Study

Sanjay Bhandari et al. Gut Liver.

Abstract

Background/aims: There is a paucity of population-based studies on the association between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and depression in the U.S. population. We sought to study this association using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) database.

Methods: We used NHANES data from 2009 to 2010. Our study included 190,269,933 U.S. adults without IBD and 2,325,226 with IBD. We sought to determine whether IBD is an independent risk factor for depressive symptoms (DS) in the U.S. population and studied the independent predictors of DS in IBD population.

Results: DS was present in 49% of the IBD population versus 23% of the non-IBD population (p<0.001). During the multivariate analysis, we found that IBD was independently associated with DS in the U.S. population (p=0.002). The independent predictors of DS in the IBD population were older age (p=0.048) and divorced/separated/widowed status (p=0.005). There was nonsignificant increase in suicidal risk in IBD population with DS versus that in non-IBD population with DS (27% vs 12%, respectively, p=0.080). Only 36% of IBD individuals with DS visited mental health professional or psychiatrist within the past year.

Conclusions: IBD is independently associated with DS in the U.S. population. Further research is warranted on risk stratification, screening and management of those with IBD who are at risk of depression.

Keywords: Depressive; Inflammatory bowel disease; National survey; Population; United States.

Conflict of interest statement

CONFLICTS OF INTEREST

No potential conflict of interest relevant to this article was reported.

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