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. 2017 Mar 6;12:5-11.
doi: 10.1515/med-2017-0002. eCollection 2017 Jan.

Effect of Electrical Stimulation on Blood Flow Velocity and Vessel Size

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Free PMC article

Effect of Electrical Stimulation on Blood Flow Velocity and Vessel Size

Hee-Kyung Jin et al. Open Med (Wars). .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Interferential current electrical stimulation alters blood flow velocity and vessel size. We aimed to investigate the changes in the autonomic nervous system depending on electrical stimulation parameters. Forty-five healthy adult male and female subjects were studied. Bipolar adhesive pad electrodes were used to stimulate the autonomic nervous system at the thoracic vertebrae 1-4 levels for 20 min. Using Doppler ultrasonography, blood flow was measured to determine velocity and vessel size before, immediately after, and 30 min after electrical stimulation. Changes in blood flow velocity were significantly different immediately and 30 min after stimulation. The interaction between intervention periods and groups was significantly different between the exercise and pain stimulation groups immediately after stimulation (p<0.05). The vessel size was significantly different before and 30 min after stimulation (p<0.05). Imbalances in the sympathetic nervous system, which regulates balance throughout the body, may present with various symptoms. Therefore, in the clinical practice, the parameters of electrical stimulation should be selectively applied in accordance with various conditions and changes in form.

Keywords: Exercise level stimulus; Interferential current; Pain level stimulus; Sensory level stimulus; Ultrasonography.

Conflict of interest statement

Conflict of interest statement: Authors state no conflict of interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Method of IFC electrode application
Figure 2
Figure 2
Device of real-time ultrasonography
Figure 3
Figure 3
Measurement of change in the blood flow velocity
Figure 4
Figure 4
Measurement of carotid artery vessel size

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