Racial and ethnic differences in treatment outcomes among adults with stimulant use disorders after a dosed exercise intervention

J Ethn Subst Abuse. Oct-Dec 2017;16(4):495-510. doi: 10.1080/15332640.2017.1317310. Epub 2017 May 19.

Abstract

The current study examined differences in substance abuse treatment outcomes among racial and ethnic groups enrolled in the Stimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise (STRIDE) trial, a multisite randomized clinical trial implemented through the National Institute on Drug Abuse's (NIDA's) Clinical Trials Network (CTN). STRIDE aimed to test vigorous exercise as a novel approach to the treatment of stimulant abuse compared to a health education intervention. A hurdle model with a complier average causal effects (CACE) adjustment was used to provide an unbiased estimate of the exercise effect had all participants been adherent to exercise. Among 214 exercise-adherent participants, we found significantly lower probability of use for Blacks (z = -2.45, p = .014) and significantly lower number of days of use for Whites compared to Hispanics (z = -54.87, p = <.001) and for Whites compared to Blacks (z = -28.54, p = <.001), which suggests that vigorous, regular exercise might improve treatment outcomes given adequate levels of adherence.

Keywords: Ethnicity; exercise; race; stimulant use disorder; stimulants.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Multicenter Study
  • Randomized Controlled Trial
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • African Americans / statistics & numerical data
  • Amphetamine-Related Disorders / ethnology
  • Amphetamine-Related Disorders / therapy*
  • Cocaine-Related Disorders / ethnology
  • Cocaine-Related Disorders / therapy*
  • European Continental Ancestry Group / statistics & numerical data
  • Exercise Therapy / methods*
  • Female
  • Health Education / methods*
  • Hispanic Americans / statistics & numerical data
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Treatment Outcome
  • Young Adult