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. 2017 May 1;56(3):269-272.

Effects of Water Bottle Materials and Filtration on Bisphenol A Content in Laboratory Animal Drinking Water

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Free PMC article

Effects of Water Bottle Materials and Filtration on Bisphenol A Content in Laboratory Animal Drinking Water

Jennifer A Honeycutt et al. J Am Assoc Lab Anim Sci. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Bisphenol A (BPA) is widely used in the polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins that are found in laboratory animal husbandry materials including cages and water bottles. Concerns about BPA exposure in humans has led to investigations that suggest physiologic health risks including disruptions to the endocrine system and CNS. However, the extent of exposure of laboratory animals to BPA in drinking water is unclear. In the first study, we compared the amount of BPA contamination in water stored in plastic bottles used in research settings with that in glass bottles. The amount of BPA that leached into water was measured across several time points ranging from 24 to 96 h by using a BPA ELISA assay. The results showed that considerable amounts of BPA (approximately 0.15 μg/L) leached from polycarbonate bottles within the first 24 h of storage. In the second study, BPA levels were measured directly from water taken from filtered compared with unfiltered taps. We observed significantly higher BPA levels in water from unfiltered taps (approximately 0.40 μg/L) compared with taps with filtration systems (approximately 0.04 μg/L). Taken together, our findings indicate that the use of different types of water bottles and water sources, combined with the use of different laboratory products (food, caging systems) between laboratories, likely contribute to decreased rigor and reproducibility in research. We suggest that researchers consider reporting the types of water bottles used and that animal care facilities educate staff regarding the importance of flushing nonfiltered water taps when filling animal water bottles.

Figures

Figure 1.
Figure 1.
BPA leached from various types of water bottles used in animal care facilities. (A) BPA levels (μg/mL) in water stored in animal water bottles over time. (B) Because no interaction with time occurred, BPA (μg/mL) levels in water stored in each bottle type are presented collapsed over time. HTPC, high-temperature polycarbonate; PC, polycarbonate. Data are presented as mean ± SEM; *, value is significantly (P < 0.05) different from that for fresh HPLC-grade water control; #, value is significantly (P < 0.05) different from that from glass. Note that BPA levels in samples from polysulfone and glass bottles at the 24- and 72-h time points were below the level of detection.
Figure 2.
Figure 2.
Comparison of BPA levels in water from filtered or unfiltered taps with that from fresh HPLC-grade water. *, value significantly (P < 0.05) different from that for HPLC-grade water.

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