Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Randomized Controlled Trial
. 2017 May 31;9(6):558.
doi: 10.3390/nu9060558.

Consumption of Dairy Yogurt Containing Lactobacillus Paracasei Ssp. Paracasei, Bifidobacterium Animalis Ssp. Lactis and Heat-Treated Lactobacillus Plantarum Improves Immune Function Including Natural Killer Cell Activity

Affiliations
Free PMC article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Consumption of Dairy Yogurt Containing Lactobacillus Paracasei Ssp. Paracasei, Bifidobacterium Animalis Ssp. Lactis and Heat-Treated Lactobacillus Plantarum Improves Immune Function Including Natural Killer Cell Activity

Ayoung Lee et al. Nutrients. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of consuming dairy yogurt containing Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei (L. paracasei), Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis (B. lactis) and heat-treated Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) on immune function. A randomized, open-label, placebo-controlled study was conducted on 200 nondiabetic subjects. Over a twelve-week period, the test group consumed dairy yogurt containing probiotics each day, whereas the placebo group consumed milk. Natural killer (NK) cell activity, interleukin (IL)-12 and immunoglobulin (Ig) G1 levels were significantly increased in the test group at twelve weeks compared to baseline. Additionally, the test group had significantly greater increases in serum NK cell activity and interferon (IFN)-γ and IgG1 than placebo group. Daily consumption of dairy yogurt containing L. paracasei, B. lactis and heat-treated L. plantarum could be an effective option to improve immune function by enhancing NK cell function and IFN-γ concentration (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT03051425).

Keywords: IFN-γ; NK cell activity; immune function; probiotics.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest. The founding sponsors had no role in the design of the study; in the collection, analyses, or interpretation of data; in the writing of the manuscript, and in the decision to publish the results.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Effects on serum interleukin (IL)-12, interferon (IFN)-γ, and immunoglobulin G1 concentrations following 12 weeks of consuming dairy yogurt containing L. paracasei, B. lactis and heat-treated L. plantarum. Mean ± SE. tested by logarithmic transformation. * p < 0.05 and ** p < 0.01 derived from paired t-tests within each group. p < 0.05 derived from independent t-tests at changed value and adjusted for baseline values, sex, and changes in diastolic blood pressure (BP).

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 6 articles

See all "Cited by" articles

References

    1. Gavazzi G., Krause K.H. Ageing and infection. Lancet Infect. Dis. 2002;2:659–666. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(02)00437-1. - DOI - PubMed
    1. Ben-Yehuda A., Weksler M.E. Immune senescence: Mechanisms and clinical implications. Cancer Investig. 1992;10:525–531. doi: 10.3109/07357909209024815. - DOI - PubMed
    1. Makinodan T., James S.J., Inamizu T., Chang M.P. Immunologic basis for susceptibility to infection in the aged. Gerontology. 1984;30:279–289. doi: 10.1159/000212647. - DOI - PubMed
    1. Adolfsson O., Meydani S.N., Russell R.M. Yogurt and gut function. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 2004;80:245–256. - PubMed
    1. El-Abbadi N.H., Dao M.C., Meydani S.N. Yogurt: Role in healthy and active aging. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 2014;99:1263S–1270S. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.113.073957. - DOI - PMC - PubMed

Publication types

MeSH terms

Associated data

Feedback