Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Comparative Study
, 17 (1), 509

Binge Drinking and Total Alcohol Consumption From 16 to 43 Years of Age Are Associated With Elevated Fasting Plasma Glucose in Women: Results From the Northern Swedish Cohort Study

Affiliations
Comparative Study

Binge Drinking and Total Alcohol Consumption From 16 to 43 Years of Age Are Associated With Elevated Fasting Plasma Glucose in Women: Results From the Northern Swedish Cohort Study

Karina Nygren et al. BMC Public Health.

Abstract

Background: Studies have indicated that moderate alcohol consumption is associated with lower incidence of diabetes in women. However, not only the amount but also the drinking pattern could be of importance when assessing the longitudinal relation between alcohol and glucose. Also, there is a lack of studies on alcohol use beginning in adolescence on adult glucose levels. The aim was to examine the association between total alcohol consumption and binge drinking between ages 16 and 43 and fasting plasma glucose at age 43.

Methods: Data were retrieved from a 27-year prospective cohort study, the Northern Swedish Cohort. In 1981, all 9th grade students (n = 1083) within a municipality in Sweden were invited to participate. There were re-assessments at ages 18, 21, 30 and 43. This particular study sample consisted of 897 participants (82.8%). Fasting plasma glucose (mmol/L) was measured at a health examination at age 43. Total alcohol consumption (in grams) and binge drinking were calculated from alcohol consumption data obtained from questionnaires.

Results: Descriptive analyses showed that men had higher levels of fasting plasma glucose as compared to women. Men also reported higher levels of alcohol consumption and binge drinking behavior. Linear regressions showed that total alcohol consumption in combination with binge drinking between ages 16 and 43 was associated with elevated fasting plasma glucose at age 43 in women (beta = 0.14, p = 0.003) but not in men after adjustment for BMI, hypertension and smoking at age 43.

Conclusions: Our findings indicate that reducing binge drinking and alcohol consumption among young and middle-aged women with the highest consumption might be metabolically favorable for their future glucose metabolism.

Keywords: Alcohol; Cohort study; Gender; Glucose metabolism.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
Calculation of total alcohol consumption ages 16–43. Value of alcohol consumption ages 16, 18, 21, 30 and 43 respectively treated as mean values and multiplied by number of years (no of years between the prior follow-up divided by two + no of years between the between each survey wave (black boxes)

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 5 articles

References

    1. Beulens JW, van der Schouw YT, Bergmann MM, Rohrmann S, Schulze MB, Buijsse B, et al. Alcohol consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes in European men and women: influence of beverage type and body size the EPIC-InterAct study. J Intern Med. 2012;272(4):358–370. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2796.2012.02532.x. - DOI - PubMed
    1. Baliunas DO, Taylor BJ, Irving H, Roerecke M, Patra J, Mohapatra S, et al. Alcohol as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Diabetes Care. 2009;32(11):2123–2132. doi: 10.2337/dc09-0227. - DOI - PMC - PubMed
    1. Koppes LL, Dekker JM, Hendriks HF, Bouter LM, Heine RJ. Moderate alcohol consumption lowers the risk of type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of prospective observational studies. Diabetes Care. 2005;28(3):719–725. doi: 10.2337/diacare.28.3.719. - DOI - PubMed
    1. Pietraszek A, Gregersen S, Hermansen K. Alcohol and type 2 diabetes. Rev Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2010; doi:10.1016/j.numecd.2010.05.001. - PubMed
    1. Wannamethee SG, Camargo CA, Jr, Manson JE, Willett WC, Rimm EB. Alcohol drinking patterns and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus among younger women. Arch Intern Med. 2003;163(11):1329–1336. doi: 10.1001/archinte.163.11.1329. - DOI - PubMed

Publication types

Feedback