Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Clinical Trial
, 85 (3), 306-8

Pilot Investigation of the Quantitative EEG and Clinical Effects of Ketazolam and the Novel Antiemetic Nonabine in Normal Subjects

Clinical Trial

Pilot Investigation of the Quantitative EEG and Clinical Effects of Ketazolam and the Novel Antiemetic Nonabine in Normal Subjects

G R McClelland et al. Psychopharmacology (Berl).

Abstract

Nonabine is a chromenol structurally related to the cannabinoids which has shown antiemetic efficacy in clinical trials. Oral doses of 5, 10, and 15 mg were given to healthy volunteers in a crossover study with the benzodiazepine ketazolam, 30 and 45 mg. Ketazolam produced sedative effects, with decreased quantitative EEG alpha activity and increased beta activity. Nonabine also produced sedative clinical effects, but with an EEG profile which resembled that reportedly caused by cannabinoids. In contrast to cannabinoids, nonabine did not cause changes of mood or perception, suggesting that nonabine lacks the potential for social abuse at antiemetic doses.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 1 article

References

    1. Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1983 Jan 29;286(6362):350-1 - PubMed
    1. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1976;282:387-98 - PubMed
    1. J Clin Pharmacol. 1981 Aug-Sep;21(8-9 Suppl):60S-63S - PubMed
    1. Lancet. 1980 May 31;1(8179):1187-8 - PubMed
    1. Ann Intern Med. 1979 Dec;91(6):819-24 - PubMed

Publication types

Feedback