Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Review
, 17 (1), 260

The Association Between Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Internet Addiction: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Affiliations
Review

The Association Between Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Internet Addiction: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Bing-Qian Wang et al. BMC Psychiatry.

Abstract

Background: This study aimed to analyze the association between Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Internet addiction (IA).

Methods: A systematic literature search was performed in four online databases in total including CENTRAL, EMBASE, PubMed and PsychINFO. Observational studies (case-control, cross-sectional and cohort studies) measuring the correlation between IA and ADHD were screened for eligibility. Two independent reviewers screened each article according to the predetermined inclusion criteria. A total of 15 studies (2 cohort studies and 13 cross-sectional studies) met our inclusion criteria and were included in the quantitative synthesis. Meta-analysis was conducted using RevMan 5.3 software.

Results: A moderate association between IA and ADHD was found. Individuals with IA were associated with more severe symptoms of ADHD, including the combined total symptom score, inattention score and hyperactivity/impulsivity score. Males were associated with IA, whereas there was no significant correlation between age and IA.

Conclusions: IA was positively associated with ADHD among adolescents and young adults. Clinicians and parents should pay more attention to the symptoms of ADHD in individuals with IA, and the monitoring of Internet use of patients suffering from ADHD is also necessary. Longitudinal studies controlling for baseline mental health are needed.

Keywords: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder; Internet addiction; Meta-analysis; Systematic review.

Conflict of interest statement

Ethics approval and consent to participate

Not applicable.

Consent for publication

Not applicable.

Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Publisher’s Note

Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
Flow chart of literature selection
Fig. 2
Fig. 2
Forest plot of crude OR
Fig. 3
Fig. 3
Forest plot of adjusted OR
Fig. 4
Fig. 4
Forest plot of total symptom score
Fig. 5
Fig. 5
Forest plot of inattention score
Fig. 6
Fig. 6
Forest plot of hyperactivity/impulsivity score

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 12 PubMed Central articles

See all "Cited by" articles

References

    1. Young KS. Psychology of computer use: XL. Addictive use of the internet: a case that breaks the stereotype. Psychol Rep. 1996;79(3 Pt 1):899–902. doi: 10.2466/pr0.1996.79.3.899. - DOI - PubMed
    1. Weinstein A, Lejoyeux M. Internet addiction or excessive internet use. Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2010;36(5):277–83. - PubMed
    1. Ko CH, Yen JY, Yen CF, Chen CS, Chen CC. The association between internet addiction and psychiatric disorder: a review of the literature. Eur Psychiatry. 2012;27(1):1–8. - PubMed
    1. Carli V, Durkee T, Wasserman D, Hadlaczky G, Despalins R, Kramarz E, Wasserman C, Sarchiapone M, Hoven CW, Brunner R, et al. The association between pathological internet use and comorbid psychopathology: a systematic review. Psychopathology. 2013;46(1):1–13. doi: 10.1159/000337971. - DOI - PubMed
    1. Ko CH, Yen JY, Chen CS, Yeh YC, Yen CF. Predictive values of psychiatric symptoms for internet addiction in adolescents: a 2-year prospective study. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009;163(10):937–43. - PubMed
Feedback