Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Filters applied. Clear all
. 2017 Jan 7;10(1):45.
doi: 10.3390/ma10010045.

Comparative Analysis of the Composition and Active Property Evaluation of Certain Essential Oils to Assess Their Potential Applications in Active Food Packaging

Affiliations
Free PMC article

Comparative Analysis of the Composition and Active Property Evaluation of Certain Essential Oils to Assess Their Potential Applications in Active Food Packaging

Cornelia Vasile et al. Materials (Basel). .
Free PMC article

Abstract

The antifungal, antibacterial, and antioxidant activity of four commercial essential oils (EOs) (thyme, clove, rosemary, and tea tree) from Romanian production were studied in order to assess them as bioactive compounds for active food packaging applications. The chemical composition of the oils was determined with the Folin-Ciocâlteu method and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry and flame ionization detectors, and it was found that they respect the AFNOR/ISO standard limits. The EOs were tested against three food spoilage fungi-Fusarium graminearum, Penicillium corylophilum, and Aspergillus brasiliensis-and three potential pathogenic food bacteria-Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Listeria monocytogenes-using the disc diffusion method. It was found that the EOs of thyme, clove, and tea tree can be used as antimicrobial agents against the tested fungi and bacteria, thyme having the highest inhibitory effect. Concerning antioxidant activity determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-azino-bis 3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) methods, it has been established that the clove oil exhibits the highest activity because of its high phenolic content. Promising results were obtained by their incorporation into chitosan emulsions and films, which show potential for food packaging. Therefore, these essential oils could be suitable alternatives to chemical additives, satisfying the consumer demand for naturally preserved food products ensuring its safety.

Keywords: antifungal; antimicrobial; antioxidant; essential oils; spoilage fungi.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
The GC-MSD and GC-FID (insert) chromatograms of thyme oil.
Figure 2
Figure 2
The GC-MSD and GC-FID (insert) chromatograms of clove oil.
Figure 3
Figure 3
The GC-MSD and GC-FID (insert) chromatograms of rosemary oil.
Figure 4
Figure 4
The GC-MSD and GC-FID (insert) chromatograms of tea tree oil.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Inhibition of the Fusarium graminearum G87 growth by the thyme, clove, rosemary, and tea tree essential oils.
Figure 6
Figure 6
Inhibition of the Penicillium corylophilum CBMF1 growth by the thyme, clove, rosemary, and tea tree essential oils.
Figure 7
Figure 7
Inhibition of the Aspergillus brasiliensis ATCC 16404 growth by the thyme, clove, rosemary, and tea tree essential oils.
Figure 8
Figure 8
Antimicrobial activity of the four essential oils (EOs) (10 µL on each disc) against S. aureus, E. coli, and L. monocytogenes using the agar disc diffusion method on an Mueller–Hinten (MH) Plate.
Figure 9
Figure 9
ABTS radical discoloration of studied essential oils (a) and the values of sample concentration required to scavenge 50% of the ABTS free radicals (IC50); (b) of selected essential oils.
Figure 10
Figure 10
The values of the sample concentration required to scavenge 50% of the DPPH free radicals (IC50) of selected essential oils.
Figure 11
Figure 11
Particle size distribution of the chitosan (a) and chitosan/tea tree oil (b) emulsions in diluted acetic acid containing surfactant Tween 80.
Figure 12
Figure 12
SEM images of (a) CS and (b) CS/rosemary or clove oil/T80 films at a 2000× magnification.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 7 articles

See all "Cited by" articles

References

    1. Pasha I., Saeed F., Sultan M.T., Khan M.R., Rohi M. Recent Developments in Minimal Processing: A Tool to Retain Nutritional Quality of Food. Crit. Rev. Food Sci. Nutr. 2014;54:340–351. doi: 10.1080/10408398.2011.585254. - DOI - PubMed
    1. NOTIZIE DALLA WHO Food safety and foodborne illness. Biochim. Clin. 2002;26:39.
    1. WHO. WIPO. WTO Antimicrobial Resistance: How to Foster Innovation, Access and Appropriate Use of Antibiotics?; Proceedings of the a Joint Technical Symposium by WHO, WIPO and WTO; New Conference Hall, WIPO Headquarters, Geneva, Switzerland. 25 October 2016.
    1. Burt S. Essential oils: Their antibacterial properties and potential applications in foods—A review. Int. J. Food Microbiol. 2004;94:223–253. doi: 10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2004.03.022. - DOI - PubMed
    1. Helander I.M., Alakomi H.-L., Latva-Kala K., Mattila-Sandholm T., Pol I., Smid E.J., Gorris L.G.M., von Wright A. Characterization of the action of selected essential oil components on Gram-Negative Bacteria. J. Agric. Food Chem. 1998;46:3590–3595. doi: 10.1021/jf980154m. - DOI
Feedback