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. 2017 Feb 28;10(3):246.
doi: 10.3390/ma10030246.

Mechanical Properties of Epoxy Resin Mortar With Sand Washing Waste as Filler

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Free PMC article

Mechanical Properties of Epoxy Resin Mortar With Sand Washing Waste as Filler

Dinberu Molla Yemam et al. Materials (Basel). .
Free PMC article

Abstract

The objective of this study was to investigate the potential use of sand washing waste as filler for epoxy resin mortar. The mechanical properties of four series of mortars containing epoxy binder at 10, 15, 20, and 25 wt. % mixed with sand blended with sand washing waste filler in the range of 0-20 wt. % were examined. The compressive and flexural strength increased with the increase in epoxy and filler content; however, above epoxy 20 wt. %, slight change was seen in strength due to increase in epoxy and filler content. Modulus of elasticity also linearly increased with the increase in filler content, but the use of epoxy content beyond 20 wt. % decreased the modulus of elasticity of the mortar. For epoxy content at 10 wt. %, poor bond strength lower than 0.8 MPa was observed, and adding filler at 20 wt. % adversely affected the bond strength, in contrast to the mortars containing epoxy at 15, 20, 25 wt. %. The results indicate that the sand washing waste can be used as potential filler for epoxy resin mortar to obtain better mechanical properties by adding the optimum level of sand washing waste filler.

Keywords: epoxy resin mortar; filler; mechanical properties; polymer binder.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest. The founding sponsors had no role in the design of the study; in the collection, analyses, or interpretation of data; in the writing of the manuscript, and in the decision to publish the results.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Particle size distribution of sand.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Sand washing waste used as filler for epoxy resin mortar in this study.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Particle size distribution of filler.
Figure 4
Figure 4
XRD spectra of filler.
Figure 5
Figure 5
(A) Compressive strength and (B) Flexural strength and modulus of elasticity through three-point bending tests.
Figure 6
Figure 6
Pull-off test method.
Figure 6
Figure 6
Pull-off test method.
Figure 7
Figure 7
Relationship of compressive strength vs. filler content at different amount of epoxy (10 wt. %, 15 wt. %, 20 wt. %, and 25 wt. %).
Figure 8
Figure 8
Relationship of flexural strength vs. filler content at different amounts of epoxy (10, 15, 20, and 25 wt. %).
Figure 9
Figure 9
Effect of filler content on the modulus of elasticity of epoxy resin mortars at different amount of epoxy (10, 15, 20, and 25 wt. %).
Figure 10
Figure 10
Relationship between modulus of elasticity (MoE) and density of sample.
Figure 11
Figure 11
Effect of filler content on the bond strength of epoxy resin mortar at different amounts of epoxy (10, 15, 20, and 25 wt. %) to substrate concrete.

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