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. 2017 May 19;10(5):551.
doi: 10.3390/ma10050551.

The Feasibility of Structural Health Monitoring Using the Fundamental Shear Horizontal Guided Wave in a Thin Aluminum Plate

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Free PMC article

The Feasibility of Structural Health Monitoring Using the Fundamental Shear Horizontal Guided Wave in a Thin Aluminum Plate

Jorge Franklin Mansur Rodrigues Filho et al. Materials (Basel). .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Structural health monitoring (SHM) is emerging as an essential tool for constant monitoring of safety-critical engineering components. Ultrasonic guided waves stand out because of their ability to propagate over long distances and because they can offer good estimates of location, severity, and type of damage. The unique properties of the fundamental shear horizontal guided wave (SH₀) mode have recently generated great interest among the SHM community. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of omnidirectional SH₀ SHM in a thin aluminum plate using a three-transducer sparse array. Descriptions of the transducer, the finite element model, and the imaging algorithm are presented. The image localization maps show a good agreement between the simulations and experimental results. The SH₀ SHM method proposed in this paper is shown to have a high resolution and to be able to locate defects within 5% of the true location. The short input signal as well the non-dispersive nature of SH₀ leads to high resolution in the reconstructed images. The defect diameter estimated using the full width at half maximum was 10 mm or twice the size of the true diameter.

Keywords: shear horizontal waves; structural health monitoring; ultrasonic guided waves.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Pair of dipole patterns excited by a point surface shear source. The lobes of the Lamb modes dipole are in opposition of phase, whereas the lobes of the SH dipole are in phase.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Schematic of the omnidirectional piezoelectric transducer assembly. The component description: 1—ABS plastic casing; 2—Epoxy–tungsten mix; 3—Piezoelectric PZT-5H patches; 4—Titanium plate.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Schematic of the finite element plate. The dimensions of the absorbing boundaries and the locations of the transducers (black squares) and of the holes (white dots) are shown in millimeters. The wave field was simulated successively after adding each defect.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Example of subtracted signals containing a defect for all pairs of transducers.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Schematic of the ellipse equation and the resulting map for all points in a 2D domain. (a) Equal travel times between a source and a sensor results in an ellipse; (b) Calculating the ellipse for all points in a domain leads to a map of travel time ellipses.
Figure 6
Figure 6
(a) Schematic of the effect caused by summing the ellipse generated by the baseline subtracted signals; (b) At a defect the ellipses are interfering constructively.
Figure 7
Figure 7
Experimental setup used in this paper. The omnidirectional SH0 transducers are identified with Numbers 1, 2, and 3. The through-thickness holes were drilled successively to ensure that the wave field for each condition was saved.
Figure 8
Figure 8
Pitch catch time-trace obtained from Transducer 1–3 in Figure 7.
Figure 9
Figure 9
Reconstructed images for the first 5 mm through-thickness hole. The white squares represent the transducers positions and the red circles correspond to the defect position. (a) The image using simulated time traces and (b) the experimental image.
Figure 10
Figure 10
Reconstructed images for the second 5 mm through-thickness hole. The white squares represent the transducers positions and the red circles correspond to the defect position. (a) The image using simulated time traces and (b) the experimental image.
Figure 11
Figure 11
Reconstructed images for the third 5 mm through-thickness hole. The white squares represent the transducers positions and the red circles correspond to the defect position. (a) The image using simulated time traces and (b) the experimental image.

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