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. 2014 Dec 2;7(12):7689-7705.
doi: 10.3390/ma7127689.

Effective Interactions Between Multilayered Ionic Microgels

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Free PMC article

Effective Interactions Between Multilayered Ionic Microgels

Clemens Hanel et al. Materials (Basel). .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Using a one-component reduction formalism, we calculate the effective interactions and the counterion density profiles for microgels that feature a multilayered shell structure. We follow a strategy that involves second order perturbation theory and obtain analytical expressions for the effective interactions by modeling the layers of the particles as linear superpostion of homogeneously charged spheres. The general method is applied to the important case of core-shell microgels and compared with the well-known results for a microgel that can be approximated by a macroscopic, and homogeneously charged, spherical macroion.

Keywords: effective interactions; linear response; mutilayered microgels; polyelectrolytes.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Radial density profiles 〈ρ±(r)〉/ρ of microions near core–shell microgels for different salt concentrations at room temperature. (a) A negative core and shell for ζ = 1/3; and (b) a positive core and negative shell for ζ = 4/3. The dashed curves are the reference results for a homogeneously charged microgel with the same overall charge and size, and the vertical lines form the borders between different types of overlapping. The bottom graphs show zoomed versions of the top graphs in order to focus on the higher salt concentrations.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Effective pair interactions veff(r)/kBT at room temperature T between core–shell microgels for different salt concentrations. (a) A negative core and shell for ζ = 1/3; and (b) a positive core and negative shell for ζ = 4/3. The dashed curves are the reference results for homogeneously charged microgels with the same overall charge and size, and the vertical lines form the borders between different types of overlapping.

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