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. 2015 Nov 3;8(11):7354-7370.
doi: 10.3390/ma8115386.

Light Steel-Timber Frame With Composite and Plaster Bracing Panels

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Free PMC article

Light Steel-Timber Frame With Composite and Plaster Bracing Panels

Roberto Scotta et al. Materials (Basel). .
Free PMC article

Abstract

The proposed light-frame structure comprises steel columns for vertical loads and an innovative bracing system to efficiently resist seismic actions. This seismic force resisting system consists of a light timber frame braced with an Oriented Strand Board (OSB) sheet and an external technoprene plaster-infilled slab. Steel brackets are used as foundation and floor connections. Experimental cyclic-loading tests were conduced to study the seismic response of two shear-wall specimens. A numerical model was calibrated on experimental results and the dynamic non-linear behavior of a case-study building was assessed. Numerical results were then used to estimate the proper behavior factor value, according to European seismic codes. Obtained results demonstrate that this innovative system is suitable for the use in seismic-prone areas thanks to the high ductility and dissipative capacity achieved by the bracing system. This favorable behavior is mainly due to the fasteners and materials used and to the correct application of the capacity design approach.

Keywords: behavior factor; innovative technoprene bracing system; light-frame structures; seismic design; steel-timber structures.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
View of the modular shear wall (where not specified dimensions are in cm).
Figure 2
Figure 2
Technoprene slab (skin): (a) Geometry (cm) and fixing points; (b) Front view; (c) Front view in detail; and (d) Back view in detail.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Steel column and brackets: (a) Geometric details of connection with foundation (dimensions in mm); (b) Connection with the foundation; and (c) Connection with the roof.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Steel column and brackets: (a) Geometric details of connection with foundation (dimensions in mm); (b) Connection with the foundation; and (c) Connection with the roof.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Wall section: (from left to right) skin, Oriented Strand Board (OSB) panel, timber stud, and steel column.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Test setup: (a) Frontal view and (b) Side view.
Figure 6
Figure 6
Experimental setup: external (a) and inner (b) views.
Figure 7
Figure 7
EN 12512 protocol [24].
Figure 8
Figure 8
Yielding of the 10 mm × 120 mm screws connecting skin to frame (single plastic hinge).
Figure 9
Figure 9
Hysteresis curves: (a) Wall A and (b) Wall B.
Figure 10
Figure 10
Wall configurations at the end of the cyclic loading tests: (a) Wall A and (b) Wall B.
Figure 11
Figure 11
Finite Element model of Wall A for model validation.
Figure 12
Figure 12
Hysteresis cycles of shear wall: (a) Top displacement vs. lateral force; (b) Displacement at hold-down vs. lateral force; and (c) Relative displacement at vertical joint vs. lateral force.
Figure 12
Figure 12
Hysteresis cycles of shear wall: (a) Top displacement vs. lateral force; (b) Displacement at hold-down vs. lateral force; and (c) Relative displacement at vertical joint vs. lateral force.
Figure 13
Figure 13
Energy comparison: (a) Accumulated hysteresis energy up to the end of the test; and (b) Dissipated energy computed for each half-cycle.
Figure 14
Figure 14
Case-study building: First-storey plan (dimensions in cm).
Figure 15
Figure 15
Obtained q-factor values, average value and 5% characteristic value.

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References

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