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Randomized Controlled Trial
, 55, 189-195

Effect of Static and Dynamic Muscle Stretching as Part of Warm Up Procedures on Knee Joint Proprioception and Strength

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Randomized Controlled Trial

Effect of Static and Dynamic Muscle Stretching as Part of Warm Up Procedures on Knee Joint Proprioception and Strength

Gregory S Walsh. Hum Mov Sci.

Abstract

Background: The importance of warm up procedures prior to athletic performance is well established. A common component of such procedures is muscle stretching. There is conflicting evidence regarding the effect of static stretching (SS) as part of warm up procedures on knee joint position sense (KJPS) and the effect of dynamic stretching (DS) on KJPS is currently unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of dynamic and static stretching as part warm up procedures on KJPS and knee extension and flexion strength.

Methods: This study had a randomised cross-over design and ten healthy adults (20±1years) attended 3 visits during which baseline KJPS, at target angles of 20° and 45°, and knee extension and flexion strength tests were followed by 15min of cycling and either a rest period (CON), SS, or DS and repeat KJPS and strength tests. All participants performed all conditions, one condition per visit.

Results: There were warm up×stretching type interactions for KJPS at 20° (p=0.024) and 45° (p=0.018), and knee flexion (p=0.002) and extension (p<0.001) strength. The SS and DS improved KJPS but CON condition did not and SS decreased strength. No change in strength was present for DS or CON.

Conclusions: Both SS and DS improve KJPS as part of pre-exercise warm up procedures. However, the negative impact of SS on muscle strength limits the utility of SS before athletic performance. If stretching is to be performed as part of a warm up, DS should be favoured over SS.

Keywords: Dynamic stretching; Joint position sense; Muscle strength; Proprioception; Static stretching; Warm-up exercise.

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