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Review
, 2017, 5715403

Helicobacter pylori Infection Is Associated With Type 2 Diabetes, Not Type 1 Diabetes: An Updated Meta-Analysis

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Review

Helicobacter pylori Infection Is Associated With Type 2 Diabetes, Not Type 1 Diabetes: An Updated Meta-Analysis

Jun-Zhen Li et al. Gastroenterol Res Pract.

Abstract

Background: Extragastric manifestations of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection have been reported in many diseases. However, there are still controversies about whether H. pylori infection is associated with diabetes mellitus (DM). This study was aimed at answering the question.

Methods: A systematic search of the literature from January 1996 to January 2016 was conducted in PubMed, Embase databases, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, Wanfang Data, China national knowledge database, and SinoMed. Published studies reporting H. pylori infection in both DM and non-DM individuals were recruited.

Results: 79 studies with 57,397 individuals were included in this meta-analysis. The prevalence of H. pylori infection in DM group (54.9%) was significantly higher than that (47.5%) in non-DM group (OR = 1.69, P < 0.001). The difference was significant in comparison between type 2 DM group and non-DM group (OR = 2.05), but not in that between type 1 DM group and non-DM group (OR = 1.23, 95% CI: 0.77-1.96, P = 0.38).

Conclusion: Our meta-analysis suggested that there is significantly higher prevalence of H. pylori infection in DM patients as compared to non-DM individuals. And the difference is associated with type 2 DM but not type 1 DM.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Flow diagram of study selection.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Forest plot for pooled prevalence of H. pylori infection in DM group and non-DM group.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Forest plot for subgroup analysis based on types of DM.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Forest plot for subgroup analysis based on geographic regions. (India, Japan, China, Qatar, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia Iran, Hong Kong, and Taiwan were included in group Asia. Greece, Turkey, Italy, Poland, Romania, Belgium, Spain, Croatia, Israel, UK, and Czech Republic were included in group Europe, as well as Australia because it comprises similar races and people who lived in similar lifestyle with these countries. Brazil and USA were included in group America. Egypt and Nigeria were included in group Africa.)
Figure 5
Figure 5
Forest plot for subgroup analysis of methods for H. pylori detection.
Figure 6
Figure 6
Funnel plot of this meta-analysis.
Figure 7
Figure 7
Begg's and Egger's funnel plot of this meta-analysis.
Figure 8
Figure 8
Adjusted funnel plot in the trim and fill method of this meta-analysis.

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