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, 61 (8), 655-660

A Comparison of the Efficacy of Intercostal Nerve Block and Peritubal Infiltration of Ropivacaine for Post-Operative Analgesia Following Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: A Prospective Randomised Double-Blind Study

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A Comparison of the Efficacy of Intercostal Nerve Block and Peritubal Infiltration of Ropivacaine for Post-Operative Analgesia Following Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: A Prospective Randomised Double-Blind Study

Nirmala Jonnavithula et al. Indian J Anaesth.

Abstract

Background and aims: Intercostal nerve blockade (ICNB) and peritubal infiltration of the nephrostomy tract are well-established regional anaesthetic techniques for alleviating pain after percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). This prospective study compared the efficacy of ICNB and peritubal local anaesthetic infiltration of the nephrostomy tract in providing post-operative analgesia following PCNL.

Methods: Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologist physical status 1 and II patients scheduled for PCNL requiring nephrostomy tube were randomised to receive either peritubal infiltration or ICNB. At the completion of the procedure, patients in Group P received peritubal infiltration and those in Group I received ICNB at 10, 11, 12th spaces using fluoroscopy guidance. Postoperatively, patients were followed for 24 h for pain using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Dynamic VAS. Rescue analgesia was inj. tramadol 1 mg/kg IV when pain score exceeded 4. Time to first rescue analgesia, number of doses and patient's satisfaction were noted in all patients.

Results: Pain scores were lower in the group I at all points of measurement than group P. The mean time to first demand for rescue analgesia was higher in Group I (13.22 ± 4.076 h vs 7.167 ± 3.92 h P - 0.001). The number of demands and the amount of analgesics consumed were less in Group I.

Conclusion: ICNB provided superior analgesia as evidenced by longer time to first demand of analgesic, reduced number of demands and consumption of rescue analgesic. Peritubal infiltration, although less efficacious, may be a safe and simple alternative technique.

Keywords: Intercostal nerve; nerve blocks; percutaneous nephrolithotomy; peritubal infiltration; ropivacaine.

Conflict of interest statement

There are no conflicts of interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Consort flow diagram
Figure 2
Figure 2
Kaplan–Meier curves showing time to rescue analgesia
Figure 3
Figure 3
Box plot graph showing patient's satisfaction

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