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Review
. 2017;136:227-277.
doi: 10.1016/bs.ai.2017.05.003. Epub 2017 Jun 10.

G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinases in the Inflammatory Response and Signaling

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Free PMC article
Review

G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinases in the Inflammatory Response and Signaling

Michael D Steury et al. Adv Immunol. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) are serine/threonine kinases that regulate a large and diverse class of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Through GRK phosphorylation and β-arrestin recruitment, GPCRs are desensitized and their signal terminated. Recent work on these kinases has expanded their role from canonical GPCR regulation to include noncanonical regulation of non-GPCR and nonreceptor substrates through phosphorylation as well as via scaffolding functions. Owing to these and other regulatory roles, GRKs have been shown to play a critical role in the outcome of a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes including chemotaxis, signaling, migration, inflammatory gene expression, etc. This diverse set of functions for these proteins makes them popular targets for therapeutics. Role for these kinases in inflammation and inflammatory disease is an evolving area of research currently pursued in many laboratories. In this review, we describe the current state of knowledge on various GRKs pertaining to their role in inflammation and inflammatory diseases.

Keywords: G protein-coupled receptor; G protein-coupled receptor kinases; GRK; Inflammation; β-Adrenergic receptor kinase.

Figures

Fig 1
Fig 1
GRK2 and its potential role in various disease processes. Some interacting partners/substrates are shown. Please see text for details.
Fig 2
Fig 2
GRK5 and its potential role in various disease processes. Some interacting partners/substrates are shown. Please see text for details.

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