The Impact of Human Papillomavirus Catch-Up Vaccination in Australia: Implications for Introduction of Multiple Age Cohort Vaccination and Postvaccination Data Interpretation

J Infect Dis. 2017 Dec 5;216(10):1205-1209. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jix476.

Abstract

We used transmission-dynamic modeling to estimate the added effectiveness of vaccinating multiple cohorts of females (12-26 years) in Australia compared with the theoretical introduction of routine-only (12-13 years) vaccination. Our results suggest that vaccinating multiple cohorts produced markedly faster direct/herd effects, and it added benefits that last for 20-70 years. Furthermore, the number needed to vaccinate to prevent 1 anogential warts (AGW) case or cervical cancer (CC) was similar for routine + catch-up (AGW = 9.9, CC = 678) and routine-only vaccination (AGW = 9.9, CC = 677), thus providing similar levels of efficiency per person vaccinated.

Keywords: anogenital warts; cervical cancers; human papillomavirus; mathematical modeling; vaccination.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Australia / epidemiology
  • Child
  • Condylomata Acuminata / epidemiology
  • Condylomata Acuminata / etiology
  • Condylomata Acuminata / prevention & control
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Papillomaviridae / immunology*
  • Papillomavirus Infections / complications
  • Papillomavirus Infections / epidemiology*
  • Papillomavirus Infections / prevention & control*
  • Papillomavirus Vaccines / immunology*
  • Population Surveillance
  • Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / epidemiology
  • Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / etiology
  • Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / prevention & control
  • Vaccination
  • Young Adult

Substances

  • Papillomavirus Vaccines