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. 2017 Oct 11;10(10):1166.
doi: 10.3390/ma10101166.

Laser-Based Lighting: Experimental Analysis and Perspectives

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Free PMC article

Laser-Based Lighting: Experimental Analysis and Perspectives

Nicola Trivellin et al. Materials (Basel). .
Free PMC article

Abstract

This paper presents an extensive analysis of the operating principles, theoretical background, advantages and limitations of laser-based lighting systems. In the first part of the paper we discuss the main advantages and issues of laser-based lighting, and present a comparison with conventional LED-lighting technology. In the second part of the paper, we present original experimental data on the stability and reliability of phosphor layers for laser lighting, based on high light-intensity and high-temperature degradation tests. In the third part of the paper (for the first time) we present a detailed comparison between three different solutions for laser lighting, based on (i) transmissive phosphor layers; (ii) a reflective/angled phosphor layer; and (iii) a parabolic reflector, by discussing the advantages and drawbacks of each approach. The results presented within this paper can be used as a guideline for the development of advanced lighting systems based on laser diodes.

Keywords: laser diode; lighting; photoluminescence; remote phosphors.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
LED-based photoluminescence measurement setup.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Degradation at constant optical power stress, comparison of ethanol and benzyl alcohol solvents.
Figure 3
Figure 3
High contrast photoluminescence images of the phosphor templates deposited by means of benzyl and ethanol solvents, before and after the ageing treatment.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Time-resolved photoluminescence signal of the YAG:Ce at different temperatures. Inset: normalized luminescence lifetime as a function of temperature.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Semilog plot of the relative photoluminescence signal of the YAG:Ce phosphor as a function of carrier temperature and at different incident intensities.
Figure 6
Figure 6
Photoluminescence signal of the YAG:Ce phosphor during the step–stress analysis. Inset: normalized spectrum of the transmitted and reflected signal.
Figure 7
Figure 7
Phosphor photoluminescence during thermal ageing at different temperatures.
Figure 8
Figure 8
Phosphor catastrophic degradation as a function of incident power.
Figure 9
Figure 9
Schematic structure of the transmitted LARP setup.
Figure 10
Figure 10
Measurement setup of the transmission LARP system.
Figure 11
Figure 11
Target spot of the transmission LARP setup at a distance of 1320 mm from the light source.
Figure 12
Figure 12
RGB FWHM divergence angle analysis for the transmission LARP setup on the major axis.
Figure 13
Figure 13
Transmission LARP-emitted output spectrum.
Figure 14
Figure 14
Luminous flux and luminous efficacy of the transmission LARP system.
Figure 15
Figure 15
Schematic structure of the reflected LARP setup nr. 1.
Figure 16
Figure 16
Schematic structure of the reflected LARP setup nr. 2.
Figure 17
Figure 17
Target spot of the reflective LARP setup REFL1 (tilted reflector) at a distance of 330 mm from the light source.
Figure 18
Figure 18
RGB FWHM divergence angle analysis for the reflective LARP setup nr. 1.
Figure 19
Figure 19
Target spot of the reflective LARP setup nr. 2 at a distance of 330 mm from the light source.
Figure 20
Figure 20
RGB FWHM divergence angle analysis for the reflective LARP setup nr. 2.
Figure 21
Figure 21
Chromatic properties of the beam emitted from the three LARP setups.

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