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. 2018 Jan 2;14(1):111-117.
doi: 10.1080/21645515.2017.1387703. Epub 2017 Nov 29.

Beliefs, Attitudes, and Activities of Healthcare Personnel About Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccines

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Beliefs, Attitudes, and Activities of Healthcare Personnel About Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccines

Fatma Çiftci et al. Hum Vaccin Immunother. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Objectives: Vaccination of healthcare personnel (HCP) is an effective measure for preventing the spread of influenza among at-risk patients. This study was conducted to determine influenza vaccination rates and activities among HCP working at a tertiary healthcare setting.

Methods: This study included 470 HCP (85 physicians, 134 nurses, 53 healthcare assistants, 44 paramedics, 47 medical secretaries, and 107 auxillary staff members) working at the emergency, cardiology, chest diseases, and internal medicine departments with the largest volume of patients with vaccination indication of two large university hospitals with similar medical practices and work environment. Each participant completed an anonymous questionnaire form.

Results: A total of 470 HCP participated in the survey. The compliance rate of the HCP to participate in the survey was 93.6%. Of these, 26.7% had been vaccinated against influenza. Vaccination in the survey year was significantly associated with having regular influenza vaccinations (OR 48.66; 95% CI:[25.09-94.369]; P<.01); having an educational level of college or higher (OR 2.07; 95% CI:[1.03-4.15]; P<.05); being a physician (OR 4.25; 95% CI:[1.28-14.07]; P< .05); and a professional experience of more than 5 years (OR 2.02; 95%CI:[1.13-5.62]; P< .05). Physicians recommended and prescribed the influenza vaccine significantly more frequently than the pneumococcal vaccine (37.6% vs 30.6%, P = .03, 25.9% vs 17.6%, P = .001, respectively). Among all HCP, the reasons for vaccination included having the opinion that the vaccine provides a partial protection against the infection (75.2%), reduces work force loss (48.8%), reduces the rates of death and severe conditions like pneumonia (43.2%), and reduces hospitalization (40.8%). The HCP had been vaccinated to protect family members (81.6%), people around (51.2%), herself/himself (47.2%), and patients (28%) fom infection. The reasons of not getting vaccinated against influenza among HCP included fear of vaccine's adverse effects (31.0%), doubts about its efficacy (28.9%) and safety (22.3%), and lack of adequate knowledge about vaccination (16.2%).

Conclusion: Our results indicated that influenza vaccination rates are low in our whole HCP sample, with physicians having a slightly better rate than other HCP. Getting regularly vaccinated, having an educational level of college or higher, being a physician, and having a professional experience of more than 5 years positively affects the rate of future vaccinations. Physicians significantly more commonly recommended and prescribed the influenza vaccine than the pneumococcal vaccine. The most important reasons for getting vaccinated included having the opinion that the vaccine provided partial protection and intending to protect family members from infection. In our whole HCP sample, the reasons of not getting vaccinated against influenza included fear of vaccine's adverse effects and doubts about its efficacy and safety. Training meetings should be held for HCPs to underscore the importance of the influenza vaccine for protection of patients against the influenza.

Keywords: healthcare personnel; influenza; influenza vaccine; pneumococcal vaccine; pneumonia.

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