Ectopic colonization of oral bacteria in the intestine drives T H 1 cell induction and inflammation

Science. 2017 Oct 20;358(6361):359-365. doi: 10.1126/science.aan4526.

Abstract

Intestinal colonization by bacteria of oral origin has been correlated with several negative health outcomes, including inflammatory bowel disease. However, a causal role of oral bacteria ectopically colonizing the intestine remains unclear. Using gnotobiotic techniques, we show that strains of Klebsiella spp. isolated from the salivary microbiota are strong inducers of T helper 1 (TH1) cells when they colonize in the gut. These Klebsiella strains are resistant to multiple antibiotics, tend to colonize when the intestinal microbiota is dysbiotic, and elicit a severe gut inflammation in the context of a genetically susceptible host. Our findings suggest that the oral cavity may serve as a reservoir for potential intestinal pathobionts that can exacerbate intestinal disease.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Anti-Bacterial Agents / pharmacology
  • Drug Resistance, Bacterial
  • Dysbiosis / immunology
  • Dysbiosis / microbiology
  • Germ-Free Life
  • Inflammatory Bowel Diseases / immunology*
  • Inflammatory Bowel Diseases / microbiology*
  • Intestines / immunology*
  • Intestines / microbiology
  • Klebsiella / drug effects
  • Klebsiella / immunology*
  • Klebsiella / isolation & purification
  • Klebsiella / pathogenicity
  • Mice
  • Mice, Inbred BALB C
  • Mice, Inbred C57BL
  • Microbiota / immunology*
  • Mouth / microbiology*
  • Saliva / microbiology
  • Th1 Cells / immunology*

Substances

  • Anti-Bacterial Agents