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. 2017 Oct 5;8:530.
doi: 10.3389/fneur.2017.00530. eCollection 2017.

Traumatic Brain Injury Severity, Neuropathophysiology, and Clinical Outcome: Insights From Multimodal Neuroimaging

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Free PMC article

Traumatic Brain Injury Severity, Neuropathophysiology, and Clinical Outcome: Insights From Multimodal Neuroimaging

Andrei Irimia et al. Front Neurol. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Background: The relationship between the acute clinical presentation of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), long-term changes in brain structure prompted by injury and chronic functional outcome is insufficiently understood. In this preliminary study, we investigate how acute Glasgow coma score (GCS) and epileptic seizure occurrence after TBIs are statistically related to functional outcome (as quantified using the Glasgow Outcome Score) and to the extent of cortical thinning observed 6 months after the traumatic event.

Methods: Using multivariate linear regression, the extent to which the acute GCS and epileptic seizure occurrence (predictor variables) correlate with structural brain changes (relative cortical atrophy) was examined in a group of 33 TBI patients. The statistical significance of the correlation between relative cortical atrophy and the Glasgow Outcome Score was also investigated.

Results: A statistically significant correlative relationship between cortical thinning and the predictor variables (acute GCS and seizure occurrence) was identified in the study sample. Regions where the statistical model was found to have highest statistical reliability in predicting both gray matter atrophy and neurological outcome include the frontopolar, middle frontal, postcentral, paracentral, middle temporal, angular, and lingual gyri. In addition, relative atrophy and GOS were also found to be significantly correlated over large portions of the cortex.

Conclusion: This study contributes to our understanding of the relationship between clinical descriptors of acute TBI, the extent of injury-related chronic brain changes and neurological outcome. This is partly because the brain areas where cortical thinning was found to be correlated with GCS and with seizure occurrence are implicated in executive control, sensory function, motor acuity, memory, and language, all of which may be affected by TBI. Thus, our quantification suggests the existence of a statistical relationship between acute clinical presentation, on the one hand, and structural/functional brain features which are particularly susceptible to post-injury degradation, on the other hand.

Keywords: Glasgow Coma Scale; Glasgow Outcome Score; clinical outcome; magnetic resonance imaging; neuroimaging; post-traumatic seizures; traumatic brain injury.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
(A) Quantification of the linear model’s ability to predict cortical atrophy extent at 6 months after injury. For each gyrus and sulcus, the null hypothesis that there is no statistically significant correlation between the predictor variables and the response variable (cortical thinning, in millimeters) was tested. Values of the F2,30 statistic for each statistical test are encoded on the cortical surface, subject to the false discovery rate correction for multiple comparisons. Darker red hues indicate higher significance of the statistical test and, consequently, stronger ability to predict cortical thinning for the areas in question. Regions where the null hypothesis was not tested because less than 90% of cortical thickness data were available (see text) are drawn in black. Regions where the test statistic was lower than the threshold F statistic of the reliability analysis permutation test are drawn in white. (B) Statistical significance of the correlation between relative cortical atrophy and the GOS-E. Values of the t31 statistic for each statistical test are encoded on the cortical surface, as in panel (A). Note that all values of this statistic are negative, which confirms that greater regional atrophy is associated with lower GOS-E values (i.e., poorer functional outcome), as expected. The values of F and t statistics in (A) and (B), respectively, are associated with different statistical tests and different degrees of freedom and, therefore, they should not be compared to one another.

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