Access to medical care for black and white Americans. A matter of continuing concern

JAMA. 1989 Jan 13;261(2):278-81.

Abstract

A 1986 national survey of use of health services shows a significant deficit in access to health care among black compared with white Americans. This gap was experienced by all income levels of black Americans. In addition, the study points to significant underuse by blacks of needed medical care. Moreover, blacks compared with whites are less likely to be satisfied with the qualitative ways their physicians treat them when they are ill, more dissatisfied with the care they receive when hospitalized, and more likely to believe that the duration of their hospitalizations is too short.

KIE: A 1986 survey consisting of telephone interviews with 10,130 persons representative of the U.S. population, living in the 48 contiguous states indicates a significant lack of access to health care among black compared with white Americans. All income levels of blacks underuse needed medical care, are less likely to be satisfied with the qualitiative ways their physicians treat them when they are ill, are more dissatisfied with the care they receive when hospitalized, and are more likely to believe that the length of their hospitalizations is too short.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • African Americans*
  • Aged
  • Child
  • Consumer Behavior
  • European Continental Ancestry Group*
  • Female
  • Health Services / statistics & numerical data
  • Health Services Accessibility* / economics
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Office Visits
  • United States