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, 54 (2), 284-288

Patterns of E-cigarette Use Frequency-National Adult Tobacco Survey, 2012-2014

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Patterns of E-cigarette Use Frequency-National Adult Tobacco Survey, 2012-2014

Saida R Sharapova et al. Am J Prev Med.

Abstract

Introduction: Accounting for occasional or intermittent e-cigarette use has yielded higher estimates of current use among U.S. adults. However, frequency of e-cigarette use by population subgroups is not well described. This study assessed e-cigarette use frequency by sociodemographic characteristics and other tobacco product use among U.S. adults.

Methods: This study analyzed combined data from the 2012-2013 (n=60,192) and 2013-2014 (n=75,233) National Adult Tobacco Survey, a telephone-based survey of U.S. adults aged ≥18 years, to assess frequency of e-cigarette use (daily, some days, rarely) by sex, age, race/ethnicity, education, annual household income, U.S. region, marital status, sexual orientation, and cigarette smoking and other tobacco product use (cigars, cigarillos, little filtered cigars; traditional pipes; water pipes; and chewing tobacco, snuff, dip, snus, and dissolvable tobacco products). Analyses took place in 2016.

Results: Among current e-cigarette users, 19.3% used daily, 29.3% used some days, and 51.4% used rarely. Daily use was lowest among younger adults, Hispanics, and those who were single, never married, or not living with a partner; and greatest among non-Hispanic Asians (p<0.0001). Among current e-cigarette users, 25.3% were cigarette-only smokers, 52.8% smoked cigarettes and used other tobacco products, 5.5% used other tobacco products only, 6.5% were former cigarette-only smokers, 6.7% were former users of cigarettes and other tobacco products, 1.3% were former other tobacco product users only, and 1.8% never used cigarettes or other tobacco products.

Conclusions: E-cigarette use frequency varies by sociodemographic characteristics and other tobacco use. Further surveillance, particularly related to frequency of e-cigarette use and its impact on cigarette cessation, could inform public health policy, planning, and practice.

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