Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Meta-Analysis
, 33 (9), 1485-1493

Baroreceptors in the Carotid and Hypertension-Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Effects of Baroreflex Activation Therapy on Blood Pressure

Affiliations
Meta-Analysis

Baroreceptors in the Carotid and Hypertension-Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Effects of Baroreflex Activation Therapy on Blood Pressure

Manuel Wallbach et al. Nephrol Dial Transplant.

Abstract

Activation of baroreceptors in the carotid modulates the autonomic nervous system. Baroreflex activation therapy (BAT), which activates baroreceptors in the carotid, has become available in the treatment of resistant hypertension. Besides this, a carotid implant modulating baroreceptors as well as pharmacological modulation of carotid bodies were quite recently presented. This review will underscore currently available and promising approaches that activate baroreceptors in the carotid, and thereby contribute to beneficial effects in patients with arterial hypertension, and discusses potential organoprotective BAT effects beyond blood pressure (BP) reduction. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted including observational studies or randomized controlled trials that investigated the effect of BAT on BP in resistant hypertension. Nine studies, seven observational and two randomized, with a total of 444 patients, were included in the evaluation. Analysing the longest follow-up visit from the different studies, there was a significant reduction of systolic BP after BAT of -36 mmHg [95% confidence interval (CI) -42 to -30 mmHg]. Separate meta-analysis of the short-term (1-6 months) and long-term effects (≥12 months) revealed a reduction of -21 mmHg (95% CI -26 to -17 mmHg) and -38 mmHg (95% CI -46 to -30 mmHg), respectively. There are promising data both in the experimental and the clinical application for BAT. Though the present meta-analysis suggests beneficial effects of BAT on BP, the results must be interpreted extremely carefully. Considering that evidence from controlled trials is very limited, it is evident that there is a strong need for further investigation.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 5 PubMed Central articles

MeSH terms

Feedback