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Randomized Controlled Trial
. 2017 Nov 1;31(4):379-392.
doi: 10.1891/1541-6577.31.4.379.

Effects of Self-Knee Massage With Ginger Oil in Patients With Osteoarthritis: An Experimental Study

Randomized Controlled Trial

Effects of Self-Knee Massage With Ginger Oil in Patients With Osteoarthritis: An Experimental Study

Betul Tosun et al. Res Theory Nurs Pract. .

Abstract

Background and purpose: The purpose of our study was to assess the effects of self-knee massage with ginger oil on pain and daily living activities in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

Methods: Participants (N = 68) were asked about their sociodemographic characteristics, pain level in the last week using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), and functionality in activities of daily living with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). Standard treatment prescribed by a physician was given to the patients with osteoarthritis. In addition to the standard treatment, self-knee massage with ginger oil twice a week was recommended to the intervention group (n = 34). At the end of the first and fifth week, participants in both groups were assessed regarding pain and functional state.

Results: The mean VAS Pain scores of the intervention group were significantly lower at the end of the first and fifth weeks (p< .05). The mean total scores and mean Function subscale scores of the WOMAC were significantly lower in massage group in the first- and fifth-week assessments (p < .05).

Implications for practice: Self-massage of the knee with ginger oil may be used as a complementary method to standard medical treatment. Nurses can easily train patients and their caregivers on knee massage, and the intervention can be implemented by patients at home without any restrictions on location.

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