Structural Basis of Nucleotide Sugar Transport Across the Golgi Membrane

Nature. 2017 Nov 23;551(7681):521-524. doi: 10.1038/nature24464. Epub 2017 Nov 15.

Abstract

Glycosylation is a fundamental cellular process that, in eukaryotes, occurs in the lumen of both the Golgi apparatus and the endoplasmic reticulum. Nucleotide sugar transporters (NSTs) are an essential component of the glycosylation pathway, providing the diverse range of substrates required for the glycosyltransferases. NSTs are linked to several developmental and immune disorders in humans, and in pathogenic microbes they have an important role in virulence. How NSTs recognize and transport activated monosaccharides, however, is currently unclear. Here we present the crystal structure of an NST, the GDP-mannose transporter Vrg4, in both the substrate-free and the bound states. A hitherto unobserved requirement of short-chain lipids in activating the transporter supports a model for regulation within the highly dynamic membranes of the Golgi apparatus. Our results provide a structural basis for understanding nucleotide sugar recognition, and provide insights into the transport and regulatory mechanism of this family of intracellular transporters.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Biological Transport
  • Crystallography, X-Ray
  • Glycosylation
  • Golgi Apparatus / metabolism*
  • Membrane Transport Proteins / chemistry*
  • Membrane Transport Proteins / metabolism*
  • Monosaccharides / metabolism*
  • Saccharomyces cerevisiae / chemistry*
  • Saccharomyces cerevisiae / cytology*
  • Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins / chemistry*
  • Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins / metabolism*
  • Structure-Activity Relationship
  • Substrate Specificity

Substances

  • Membrane Transport Proteins
  • Monosaccharides
  • Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins
  • VRG4 protein, S cerevisiae