Osteomyelitis After Calcium Phosphate Subchondroplasty A Case Report

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013). 2017 Dec;75(4):282-285.

Abstract

Subchondroplasty is a relatively new procedure developed to treat bone marrow lesions by injecting a calcium phosphate bone substitute into the pathologic, subchondral area of bone under fluoroscopic guidance. The procedure is described as a minimally invasive strategy that provides reliable relief of pain while preserving the native joint with minimal risk of significant complications. No prospective, randomized clinical trials have reported the efficacy of the procedure. Here, we present the case of a 64-year-old healthy male who developed Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis following subchondroplasty requiring further surgical intervention and intravenous antibiotic therapy.

Publication types

  • Case Reports

MeSH terms

  • Arthroplasty, Subchondral / adverse effects*
  • Bone Marrow Diseases / surgery
  • Bone Substitutes / therapeutic use*
  • Calcium Phosphates / therapeutic use*
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Osteomyelitis / diagnosis
  • Osteomyelitis / etiology*
  • Osteomyelitis / therapy
  • Postoperative Complications / diagnosis
  • Postoperative Complications / etiology*
  • Postoperative Complications / therapy
  • Staphylococcal Infections / diagnosis
  • Staphylococcal Infections / etiology*
  • Staphylococcal Infections / therapy
  • Staphylococcus aureus

Substances

  • Bone Substitutes
  • Calcium Phosphates
  • calcium phosphate