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. 2017 Oct 12;4(10):e005123.
doi: 10.1099/jmmcr.0.005123. eCollection 2017 Oct.

The First Case Report of Septic Abortion Resulting From β-Lactamase-Negative Ampicillin-Resistant Non-Typeable Haemophilus influenzae Infection

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Case Reports

The First Case Report of Septic Abortion Resulting From β-Lactamase-Negative Ampicillin-Resistant Non-Typeable Haemophilus influenzae Infection

Hiroaki Baba et al. JMM Case Rep. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Introduction. This is the first case report of septic abortion due to β-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant (BLNAR) non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae infection. In Japan, BLNAR H. influenzae is widespread and has become a clinical concern, especially in paediatrics and otolaryngology, but H. influenzae has not been previously recognized as a causative agent of obstetric or gynaecological infection. Case presentation. A 31-year-old pregnant woman presented at 17 weeks and 6 days of gestation with a high fever; she was admitted with a diagnosis of threatened premature delivery. Despite tocolytic treatment, she aborted spontaneously 2 h after admission and then entered septic shock. BLNAR H. influenzae was detected in both blood and vaginal cultures. Her condition gradually improved after several days of treatment with cefotaxime, and she was ultimately discharged without sequelae or complaints. Conclusion. Although penicillin with a β-lactamase inhibitor is currently recommended for the treatment of septic abortion, this combination will probably lead to treatment failure in the case of BLNAR H. influenzae infection. As this study reveals, H. influenzae can cause septic abortion; hence, future efforts should be undertaken to detect and therapeutically target this pathogen during pregnancy.

Keywords: Haemophilus influenzae; cefotaxime; sepsis; septic abortion; β-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant (BLNAR).

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