Dyslexie font does not benefit reading in children with or without dyslexia

Ann Dyslexia. 2018 Apr;68(1):25-42. doi: 10.1007/s11881-017-0154-6. Epub 2017 Dec 4.

Abstract

In two experiments, the claim was tested that the font "Dyslexie", specifically designed for people with dyslexia, eases reading performance of children with (and without) dyslexia. Three questions were investigated. (1) Does the Dyslexie font lead to faster and/or more accurate reading? (2) Do children have a preference for the Dyslexie font? And, (3) is font preference related to reading performance? In Experiment 1, children with dyslexia (n = 170) did not read text written in Dyslexie font faster or more accurately than in Arial font. The majority preferred reading in Arial and preference was not related to reading performance. In Experiment 2, children with (n = 102) and without dyslexia (n = 45) read word lists in three different font types (Dyslexie, Arial, Times New Roman). Words written in Dyslexie font were not read faster or more accurately. Moreover, participants showed a preference for the fonts Arial and Times New Roman rather than Dyslexie, and again, preference was not related to reading performance. These experiments clearly justify the conclusion that the Dyslexie font neither benefits nor impedes the reading process of children with and without dyslexia.

Keywords: Dyslexia; Font; Reading.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study

MeSH terms

  • Child
  • Dyslexia / diagnosis*
  • Dyslexia / psychology*
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Photic Stimulation / methods*
  • Reading*
  • Writing* / standards