Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
, 12 (2), 201-207

Rapid Changes in Serum Lipid Profiles During Combination Therapy With Daclatasvir and Asunaprevir in Patients Infected With Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1b

Affiliations

Rapid Changes in Serum Lipid Profiles During Combination Therapy With Daclatasvir and Asunaprevir in Patients Infected With Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1b

Takeshi Chida et al. Gut Liver.

Abstract

Background/aims: Changes in lipid profiles in patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) during direct-acting antiviral therapy have been reported in recent years. However, the clinical aspects of disturbed lipid metabolism in chronic HCV infection have not been fully elucidated.

Methods: Dynamic changes in serum total, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and apolipoprotein levels in patients infected with HCV genotype 1b were examined during combination therapy with daclatasvir (DCV) and asunaprevir (ASV).

Results: Total, LDL-, and HDL-cholesterol levels increased rapidly and persistently after week 4. Apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, apo B, apo C-II, and apo C-III levels were significantly higher at week 4 than at week 0. In contrast, apo A-II and apo E levels were significantly lower. The differences in LDL- and HDL-cholesterol levels were positively correlated with those of apo B and apo A-I, respectively. Interestingly, in patients with non-sustained virological response, these cholesterol levels decreased rapidly after viral breakthrough or viral relapse. Furthermore, similar changes were observed for apo A-I, apo B and apo C-III levels.

Conclusions: Clearance of HCV using combination therapy with DCV and ASV results in rapid changes in serum lipid profiles, suggesting an influence of HCV infection on disturbed lipid metabolism.

Keywords: Apolipoproteins; Disturbed lipid metabolism; Hepatitis C virus infection.

Conflict of interest statement

CONFLICTS OF INTEREST

No potential conflict of interest relevant to this article was reported.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
Serial changes in serum total (A), low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol (B), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol (C) levels after the initiation of combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir in hepatitis C virus patients. p-values compared to week 0 of treatment. FU, follow-up. *p<0.05, p<0.01, p<0.001, §p<0.0001, and determined using the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn’s multiple comparison test.
Fig. 2
Fig. 2
Changes in apolipoprotein (apo) A-I (A), apo A-II (B), apo B (C), apo C-II (D), apo C-III (E), and apo E (F) levels from week 0 to week 4 during combination therapy with daclatasvir (DCV) and asunaprevir (ASV) in 44 patients. *p<0.05, p<0.01, p<0.001, §p<0.0001, and determined using Wilcoxon’s paired sign-rank test.
Fig. 3
Fig. 3
Correlation between the differences of serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol (A) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels (B) with those of serum apolipoprotein (apo) B and apo A-I levels, respectively, from week 0 to week 4 during combination therapy with daclatasvir (DCV) and asunaprevir (ASV) in 44 patients. Correlation coefficients were calculated using linear correlation analysis.
Fig. 4
Fig. 4
Serial changes in serum albumin (A) and cholinesterase levels (B) after the initiation of combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir in hepatitis C virus patients. p-values compared to week 0 of treatment. FU, follow-up. *p<0.01 and p<0.0001 determined using the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn’s multiple comparison test.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 1 PubMed Central articles

References

    1. Syed GH, Amako Y, Siddiqui A. Hepatitis C virus hijacks host lipid metabolism. Trends Endocrinol Metab. 2010;21:33–40. doi: 10.1016/j.tem.2009.07.005. - DOI - PMC - PubMed
    1. Hui JM, Sud A, Farrell GC, et al. Insulin resistance is associated with chronic hepatitis C virus infection and fibrosis progression [corrected] Gastroenterology. 2003;125:1695–1704. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2003.08.032. - DOI - PubMed
    1. Felmlee DJ, Hafirassou ML, Lefevre M, Baumert TF, Schuster C. Hepatitis C virus, cholesterol and lipoproteins: impact for the viral life cycle and pathogenesis of liver disease. Viruses. 2013;5:1292–1324. doi: 10.3390/v5051292. - DOI - PMC - PubMed
    1. André P, Komurian-Pradel F, Deforges S, et al. Characterization of low- and very-low-density hepatitis C virus RNA-containing particles. J Virol. 2002;76:6919–6928. doi: 10.1128/JVI.76.14.6919-6928.2002. - DOI - PMC - PubMed
    1. Diaz O, Delers F, Maynard M, et al. Preferential association of hepatitis C virus with apolipoprotein B48-containing lipoproteins. J Gen Virol. 2006;87(Pt 10):2983–2991. doi: 10.1099/vir.0.82033-0. - DOI - PMC - PubMed

MeSH terms

LinkOut - more resources

Feedback