Clinical and neuroimaging characteristics of cerebral sinovenous thrombosis in neonates undergoing cardiac surgery

J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2018 Mar;155(3):1150-1158. doi: 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2017.10.083. Epub 2017 Nov 8.

Abstract

Objectives: Neonates with congenital heart disease may have an increased risk of cerebral sinovenous thrombosis, but incidence rates are lacking. This study describes the clinical and neuroimaging characteristics of cerebral sinovenous thrombosis in neonates undergoing cardiac surgery.

Methods: Forty neonates (78% male) requiring neonatal univentricular or biventricular cardiac repair using cardiopulmonary bypass were included. All underwent preoperative (median postnatal day 7) and postoperative (median postoperative day 7) magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, including venography, to detect cerebral sinovenous thrombosis. Clinical characteristics were compared between cerebral sinovenous thrombosis positive and cerebral sinovenous thrombosis negative neonates.

Results: Postoperatively, cerebral sinovenous thrombosis was diagnosed in 11 neonates (28%), with the transverse sinus affected in all, and involvement of multiple sinuses in 10 (91%). Preoperatively, signs of thrombosis were seen in 3 cases (8%). Focal infarction of the basal ganglia was significantly more common in cerebral sinovenous thrombosis positive than cerebral sinovenous thrombosis negative neonates (P = .025). Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis positive neonates spent more time in the intensive care unit preoperatively (P = .001), had lower weight (P = .024) and lower postmenstrual age (P = .030) at surgery, and had prolonged use of a central venous catheter (P = .023) and a catheter placed in the internal jugular vein more often (P = .039). Surgical and postoperative factors were not different between new postoperative cerebral sinovenous thrombosis positive and cerebral sinovenous thrombosis negative neonates.

Conclusions: Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis might be more common than previously understood in neonates undergoing cardiac surgery. In our study, cerebral sinovenous thrombosis was associated with a higher risk of additional intra-parenchymal brain injury.

Keywords: MRI; brain; congenital heart disease; newborn; venography.

Publication types

  • Video-Audio Media

MeSH terms

  • Age Factors
  • Cardiac Surgical Procedures* / adverse effects
  • Cardiopulmonary Bypass
  • Cerebral Angiography / methods*
  • Female
  • Heart Defects, Congenital / complications
  • Heart Defects, Congenital / diagnostic imaging
  • Heart Defects, Congenital / surgery*
  • Humans
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Magnetic Resonance Angiography*
  • Male
  • Phlebography*
  • Predictive Value of Tests
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Risk Factors
  • Sinus Thrombosis, Intracranial / complications
  • Sinus Thrombosis, Intracranial / diagnostic imaging*
  • Time Factors
  • Treatment Outcome