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Review
. 2017 Dec 28;10(1):25.
doi: 10.3390/nu10010025.

Dairy Products Intake and Endometrial Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

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Free PMC article
Review

Dairy Products Intake and Endometrial Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

Xiaofan Li et al. Nutrients. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Observational studies have suggested inconsistent findings on the relationship between dairy products intake and endometrial cancer risk. This study aimed to conduct a meta-analysis to evaluate this correlation; moreover, databases including PubMed, ISI Web of Science, and Embase were screened for relevant studies up to 26 February 2017. The inverse variance weighting method and random effects models were used to calculate the overall OR (odds ratio) values and 95% confidence interval (CI). A total of 2 cohort study and 16 case-control studies were included in the current analysis. No significant association was observed between endometrial cancer risk and the intake of total dairy products, milk, or cheese for the highest versus the lowest exposure category (total dairy products (14 studies): OR 1.04, 95% CI: 0.97-1.11, I² = 73%, p = 0.000; milk (6 studies): 0.99, 95% CI: 0.89-1.10, I² = 0.0%, p = 0.43; cheese (5 studies): 0.89, 95% CI: 0.76-1.05, I² = 39%, p = 0.16). The only cohort study with a total of 456,513 participants reported a positive association of butter intake with endometrial cancer risk (OR = 1.14; 95% CI = 1.03-1.26, I² = 2.6%, p = 0.31). There was a significant negative association of dairy products intake and endometrial cancer risk among women with a higher body mass index (BMI) (5 studies, OR 0.66, 95% CI = 0.46-0.96, I² = 75.8%, p = 0.002). Stratifying the analyses by risk factors including BMI should be taken into account when exploring the association of dairy products intake with endometrial cancer risk. Further well-designed studies are needed.

Keywords: butter; dairy products; endometrial cancer; meta-analysis; milk; nutrients; subgroup analysis.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Study flow diagram.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Forest plot of the summary risk estimate of endometrial cancer in the highest category of dairy intake compared with that in the lowest category by the random effects model. OR, odds ratio; CI, confidence interval.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Funnel plot of the meta-analysis for the association between total dairy intake and risk of endometrial cancer.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Egger’s regression asymmetry test of the meta-analysis for the association between total dairy intake and risk of endometrial cancer.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Forest plot of the summary risk estimate of endometrial cancer in the highest category of total dairy intake compared with that in the lowest category after exclusion of Newcastle—Ottawa Quality assessment scale (NOS) scores less than 6 by the random effects model. OR, odds ratio; CI, confidence interval.
Figure 6
Figure 6
Subgroup analysis of the forest plot of the risk estimate of endometrial cancer comparing the highest category of dairy intake with the lowest category. OR, odds ratio; CI, confidence interval; BMI, body mass index.

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