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Randomized Controlled Trial
. 2018 May;19(5):399-404.e3.
doi: 10.1016/j.jamda.2017.11.002. Epub 2017 Dec 27.

A Randomized Controlled Study Comparing a DPP4 Inhibitor (Linagliptin) and Basal Insulin (Glargine) in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes in Long-term Care and Skilled Nursing Facilities: Linagliptin-LTC Trial

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Free PMC article
Randomized Controlled Trial

A Randomized Controlled Study Comparing a DPP4 Inhibitor (Linagliptin) and Basal Insulin (Glargine) in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes in Long-term Care and Skilled Nursing Facilities: Linagliptin-LTC Trial

Guillermo E Umpierrez et al. J Am Med Dir Assoc. .
Free PMC article

Erratum in

  • Erratum.
    J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2019 Jul;20(7):925. doi: 10.1016/j.jamda.2019.04.008. Epub 2019 May 27. J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2019. PMID: 31147287 No abstract available.

Abstract

Objectives: Safe and easily implemented treatment regimens are needed for the management of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in long-term care (LTC) and skilled nursing facilities.

Design: This 6-month open-label randomized controlled trial compared the efficacy and safety of a DPP4 inhibitor (linagliptin) and basal insulin (glargine) in LTC residents with T2DM.

Settings: Three LTC institutions affiliated with a community safety-net hospital, US Department of Veterans Affairs and Emory Healthcare System in Atlanta, Georgia.

Participants: A total of 140 residents with T2DM treated with oral antidiabetic agents or low-dose insulin (≤0.1 U/kg/d), with fasting or premeal blood glucose (BG) > 180 mg/dL and/or HbA1c >7.5%.

Intervention: Baseline antidiabetic therapy, except metformin, was discontinued on trial entry. Residents were treated with linagliptin 5 mg/d (n = 67) or glargine at a starting dose of 0.1 U/kg/d (n = 73). Both groups received supplemental rapid-acting insulin before meals for BG > 200 mg/dL.

Measurements: Primary outcome was mean difference in daily BG between groups. Main secondary endpoints included differences in frequency of hypoglycemia, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), complications, emergency department visits, and hospital transfers.

Results: Treatment with linagliptin resulted in no significant differences in mean daily BG (146 ± 34 mg/dL vs. 157 ± 36 mg/dL, P = .07) compared to glargine. Linagliptin treatment resulted in fewer mild hypoglycemic events <70 mg/dL (3% vs. 37%, P < .001), but there were no differences in BG < 54 mg/dL (P = .06) or <40 mg/dL (P = .05) compared to glargine. There were no significant between-group differences in HbA1c, length of stay, complications, emergency department visits, or hospitalizations.

Conclusion: Treatment with linagliptin resulted in noninferior glycemic control and in significantly lower risk of hypoglycemia compared to insulin glargine in long-term care and skilled nursing facility residents with type 2 diabetes.

Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02061969.

Keywords: DPP4 inhibitors; Incretin; basal insulin; diabetes; glargine; hospital hyperglycemia; linagliptin; long-term care; nursing home; older adults; skilled nursing facilities.

Conflict of interest statement

No other potential conflict of interest relevant to this article was reported.

Figures

None
Study Flow Diagram.
Fig. 1
Fig. 1
Change in glycemic control in participants treated with glargine (±metformin) and linagliptin (±metformin) during the study period. (A) BG and duration of treatment; (B) HbA1c change at 3 and 6 months.
Fig. 2
Fig. 2
Frequency of hypoglycemia in participants treated with basal insulin (±metformin) and linagliptin (±metformin).

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