Association Between Exposure to Ambient Air Particulates and Metabolic Syndrome Components in a Saudi Arabian Population

Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Dec 25;15(1):27. doi: 10.3390/ijerph15010027.

Abstract

Recent epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to particulates may be a factor in the etiology of metabolic syndrome (MetS). In this novel study, we investigated the relationship between particulate levels and prevalence of MetS component abnormalities (hypertension, hyperglycemia, obesity) in a recruited cohort (N = 2025) in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. We observed significant associations between a 10 μg/m³ increase in PM2.5 and increased risks for MetS (Risk Ratio (RR): 1.12; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.06-1.19), hyperglycemia (RR: 1.08; 95% CI: 1.03-1.14), and hypertension (RR: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.04-1.14). PM2.5 from soil/road dust was found to be associated with hyperglycemia (RR: 1.12; 95% CI: 1.06-1.19) and hypertension (RR: 1.11; 95% CI: 1.05-1.18), while PM2.5 from traffic was associated with hyperglycemia (RR: 1.33; 95% CI: 1.05-1.71). We did not observe any health associations with source-specific mass exposures. Our findings suggest that exposure to specific elemental components of PM2.5, especially Ni, may contribute to the development of cardiometabolic disorders.

Keywords: air pollution; diabetes; hyperglycemia; hypertension; metabolic syndrome; particulate matter.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Air Pollutants / adverse effects
  • Air Pollutants / analysis
  • Cohort Studies
  • Dust / analysis*
  • Environmental Exposure / adverse effects*
  • Environmental Exposure / analysis
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Hyperglycemia / epidemiology
  • Hyperglycemia / etiology*
  • Hypertension / epidemiology
  • Hypertension / etiology*
  • Male
  • Metabolic Syndrome / epidemiology
  • Metabolic Syndrome / etiology*
  • Middle Aged
  • Particulate Matter / adverse effects*
  • Particulate Matter / analysis*
  • Prevalence
  • Saudi Arabia / epidemiology

Substances

  • Air Pollutants
  • Dust
  • Particulate Matter