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Review
, 8 (1), 325

Transplantation of Olfactory Ensheathing Cells on Functional Recovery and Neuropathic Pain After Spinal Cord Injury; Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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Review

Transplantation of Olfactory Ensheathing Cells on Functional Recovery and Neuropathic Pain After Spinal Cord Injury; Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Babak Nakhjavan-Shahraki et al. Sci Rep.

Abstract

There are considerable disagreements on the application of olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC) for spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation. The present meta-analysis was designed to investigate the efficacy of OEC transplantation on motor function recovery and neuropathic pain alleviation in SCI animal models. Accordingly, all related studies were identified and included. Two independent researchers assessed the quality of the articles and summarized them by calculating standardized mean differences (SMD). OEC transplantation was shown to significantly improve functional recovery (SMD = 1.36; 95% confidence interval: 1.05-1.68; p < 0.001). The efficacy of this method was higher in thoracic injuries (SMD = 1.41; 95% confidence interval: 1.08-1.74; p < 0.001) and allogeneic transplants (SMD = 1.53; 95% confidence interval: 1.15-1.90; p < 0.001). OEC transplantation had no considerable effects on the improvement of hyperalgesia (SMD = -0.095; 95% confidence interval: -0.42-0.23; p = 0.57) but when the analyses were limited to studies with follow-up ≥8 weeks, it was associated with increased hyperalgesia (SMD = -0.66; 95% confidence interval: -1.28-0.04; p = 0.04). OEC transplantation did not affect SCI-induced allodynia (SMD = 0.54; 95% confidence interval: -0.80-1.87; p = 0.43). Our findings showed that OEC transplantation can significantly improve motor function post-SCI, but it has no effect on allodynia and might lead to relative aggravation of hyperalgesia.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Flowchart of including studies in the meta-analysis.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Efficacy of olfactory ensheathing cells transplantation on motor function recovery after spinal cord injury. CI: Confidence interval; SMD: Standardized mean difference.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Efficacy of olfactory ensheathing cells transplantation on hyperalgesia (A) and allodynia (B) after spinal cord injury. CI: Confidence interval; SMD: Standardized mean difference.

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