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. 2018 Mar;236(3):821-828.
doi: 10.1007/s00221-018-5181-y. Epub 2018 Jan 17.

Executive Control and Faithfulness: Only Long-Term Romantic Relationships Require Prefrontal Control

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Executive Control and Faithfulness: Only Long-Term Romantic Relationships Require Prefrontal Control

Ryuhei Ueda et al. Exp Brain Res. .

Abstract

Individuals in the early stages of a romantic relationship generally express intense passionate love toward their partners. This observation allows us to hypothesize that the regulation of interest in extra-pair relationships by executive control, which is supported by the function of the prefrontal cortex, is less required in individuals in the early stages of a relationship than it is in those who are in a long-term relationship. To test this hypothesis, we asked male participants in romantic relationships to perform a go/no-go task during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which is a well-validated task that can measure right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) activity implicated in executive control. Subsequently, the participants engaged in a date-rating task in which they rated how much they wanted to date unfamiliar females. We found that individuals with higher right VLPFC activity better regulated their interest in dates with unfamiliar females. Importantly, this relationship was found only in individuals with long-term partners, but not in those with short-term partners, indicating that the active regulation of interest in extra-pair relationships is required only in individuals in a long-term relationship. Our findings extend previous findings on executive control in the maintenance of monogamous relationships by highlighting the role of the VLPFC, which varies according to the stage of the romantic relationship.

Keywords: Monogamy; Prefrontal cortex; Romantic relationship; Self-control; fMRI.

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