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. 2018 May;113(5):817-827.
doi: 10.1111/add.14132. Epub 2018 Jan 25.

Motivation to Reduce Alcohol Consumption and Subsequent Attempts at Reduction and Changes in Consumption in Increasing and Higher-Risk Drinkers in England: A Prospective Population Survey

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Free PMC article

Motivation to Reduce Alcohol Consumption and Subsequent Attempts at Reduction and Changes in Consumption in Increasing and Higher-Risk Drinkers in England: A Prospective Population Survey

Frank de Vocht et al. Addiction. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Aims: To assess how far motivation to reduce alcohol consumption in increasing and higher-risk drinkers in England predicts self-reported attempts to reduce alcohol consumption and changes in alcohol intake during the following 6 months.

Methods: This study used self-reported data from 2928 higher-risk drinkers in the Alcohol Toolkit Study (ATS): a series of monthly cross-sectional household surveys of adults aged 16+ years of age in England. Alcohol consumption was measured in an initial survey and in a 6-month telephone follow-up interview using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT)-C questionnaire. Motivation was measured in the initial survey using the Motivation to Reduce Alcohol Consumption (MRAC) scale. Attempts to reduce alcohol consumption during the past 6 months were recorded at follow-up. Data were analysed using repeated-measures difference-in-differences and logistic regression models.

Results: Participants with higher initial motivation to reduce alcohol consumption were more likely to report that they had made an attempt to reduce consumption at follow-up [adjusted odds ratio (ORadj ) = 2.39, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.75-3.29]. There was an overall reduction in alcohol consumption between initial survey and follow-up (ORadj = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.65-0.79), but there was insufficient evidence of an additional effect of motivation to reduce consumption on subsequent changes in alcohol consumption, with the difference-in-differences effect instead suggesting an average increase (ORadj = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.00-1.88).

Conclusions: Increasing and higher-risk drinkers in England who report greater motivation to reduce their consumption are more likely to report making an attempt to reduce during the next 6 months, but this may not be associated with a reduction in alcohol consumption.

Keywords: ATS; Alcohol; Alcohol Toolkit Study; audit; behaviour; consumption; motivation.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Histogram of Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT)‐C scores at the initial survey and follow‐up, stratified by motivation to reduce intake now (definition 1) reported in the initial survey. [Colour figure can be viewed at http://wileyonlinelibrary.com]
Figure 2
Figure 2
Example: average change in Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT)‐C score relative to non‐motivated baseline score. Note that follow‐up odds ratios are calculated as exp(βmotivation + βtime (+ βDIDinteraction)). [Colour figure can be viewed at http://wileyonlinelibrary.com]

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