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, 97 (5), e9635

The Expression and Significance of microRNA in Different Stages of Colorectal Cancer

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The Expression and Significance of microRNA in Different Stages of Colorectal Cancer

Binbin Du et al. Medicine (Baltimore).

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study is to compare microRNA expression patterns in different stages of colorectal cancer (CRC) and to discuss the significance of the application of microRNAs in the clinical treatment of CRC.

Methods: The study used gene chip technology to analyze genetic sequences in CRC tissues and surrounding normal tissues at different cancer stages. The bioinformatics profiles of the target genes of the different microRNAs were analyzed to clarify the target gene-related pathways and their functions in the disease.

Results: A total of 368 target genes with differential expression, including 275 upregulated and 93 downregulated genes, were screened from CRC patients in different stages of the disease. These microRNAs participated widely in the occurrence and development processes of CRC. The microRNA expression profiles obviously differed in tissues at different CRC stages.

Conclusion: microRNA regulation of CRC samples can be used as a tool to control the occurrence and development of tumor cells.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
(A) Cluster data for all samples. In the diagram, each column represents a sample, and each row represents the degree of miRNA expression. (B) Box-whisker plots for all samples. In the image, the blue represents the cancer tissues, whereas red represents the cancer-surrounding tissues. C = cancer tissues, CS = cancer-surrounding tissues.
Figure 2
Figure 2
(A) The scatter plot of signal values compared PCS with the LCS. (B) The scatter plot of signal values compared C with the CS. (C) The scatter plot of signal values compared PC with the LC. C = cancer tissues, CS = cancer-surrounding tissues, LC =  later cancer tissues, LCS = later cancer-surrounding tissues, PC = primary cancer tissues, PCS = primary cancer-surrounding tissues.
Figure 3
Figure 3
(A) Significantly enriched KEGG-DISEASE terms (top 30). Following comparisons of the PC and LC samples, the target gene annotation results were analyzed in the KEGG-DISEASE database. (B) Significantly enriched KEGG-PATHWAY terms (top 30). Following comparisons of the PC and LC samples, the target gene annotation results were analyzed in the KEGG-PATHWAY database. LC =  later cancer tissues, PC = primary cancer tissues.
Figure 4
Figure 4
(A) Significantly enriched KEGG-DISEASE terms (top 30). Following comparisons of the C and CS samples, the target gene annotation results were analyzed with the KEGG-DISEASE database. (B) Significantly enriched KEGG-PATHWAY terms (top 30). Following comparisons of the C and CS samples, the target gene annotation results were analyzed with the KEGG-PATHWAY database. C = cancer tissues, CS = cancer-surrounding tissues.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Significantly enriched GO terms (top 30). The GO (gene ontology) annotation results following comparisons of the C and CS samples. C = cancer tissues, CS = cancer-surrounding tissues, GO = gene ontology.
Figure 6
Figure 6
Significantly enriched GO terms (top 30). Following comparisons of the PC and LC samples, the target gene annotation results from the GO (gene ontology) analysis are shown. GO = gene ontology, LC =  later cancer tissues, PC = primary cancer tissues.

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Cited by 4 PubMed Central articles

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