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. 2018 Jan;30(1):108-112.
doi: 10.1589/jpts.30.108. Epub 2018 Jan 27.

Non-surgical Improvement of Cervical Lordosis Is Possible in Advanced Spinal Osteoarthritis: A CBP ® Case Report

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Free PMC article

Non-surgical Improvement of Cervical Lordosis Is Possible in Advanced Spinal Osteoarthritis: A CBP ® Case Report

Miles O Fortner et al. J Phys Ther Sci. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

[Purpose] To present a case of the non-surgical improvement in cervical kyphosis in a patient with history of cervical spine trauma and advanced osteoarthritis. [Subject and Methods] A 38 year old male presented with a chief complaint of chronic neck pain that was not substantially relieved by recent previous traditional physiotherapy and chiropractic manipulation. The cervical radiograph demonstrated a cervical hypolordosis of 5° as measured by the Harrison posterior tangent method from C2-C7. There was a 15° kyphosis at C4-C6 with advanced degenerative changes consistent with previous spine trauma. The patient was treated by CBP® methods incorporating cervical extension traction, extension exercises, and spinal manipulation for 30 sessions over an 18 week period. [Results] After the treatment sessions, there was a substantial (27°) increase in global C2-C7 lordosis, and 5° decrease in C4-C6 degenerative kyphosis corresponding to the reduction in neck pain and disability, and an improvement in overall health status as indicated on the SF-36 health questionnaire. [Conclusion] Although degenerative spondylosis of the cervical spine will have physical limitations to non-surgical correction, this case serves as an example that it is possible to reduce degenerative kyphosis and increase global cervical lordosis corresponding to health improvements in these patients.

Keywords: Cervical kyphosis; Extension traction; Osteoarthritis.

Figures

Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.
Neutral standing lateral cervical radiographs. Left: Initial taken on 4-12-17. Right: Follow-up taken 8-28-17. Green line represents ideal alignment; red line highlights posterior vertebral body margins. Note the Clay shoveler’s fracture of spinous process of C7; severe degenerative changes to vertebral body’s C4-C7 as well as the region’s initial exaggerated kyphotic deformation indicative of previous trauma.
Fig. 2.
Fig. 2.
Pope 2-way cervical extension traction.
Fig. 3.
Fig. 3.
Cervical extension exercises performed on the PowerPlate.

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