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Randomized Controlled Trial
. 2018 Jan 23;15:5.
doi: 10.1186/s12970-018-0208-0. eCollection 2018.

Effects of Lemon Verbena Extract (Recoverben®) Supplementation on Muscle Strength and Recovery After Exhaustive Exercise: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

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Free PMC article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Effects of Lemon Verbena Extract (Recoverben®) Supplementation on Muscle Strength and Recovery After Exhaustive Exercise: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

Sybille Buchwald-Werner et al. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Background: Exhaustive exercise causes muscle damage accompanied by oxidative stress and inflammation leading to muscle fatigue and muscle soreness. Lemon verbena leaves, commonly used as tea and refreshing beverage, demonstrated antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a proprietary lemon verbena extract (Recoverben®) on muscle strength and recovery after exhaustive exercise in comparison to a placebo product.

Methods: The study was performed as a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study with parallel design. Forty-four healthy males and females, which were 22-50 years old and active in sports, were randomized to 400 mg lemon verbena extract once daily or placebo. The 15 days intervention was divided into 10 days supplementation prior to the exhaustive exercise day (intensive jump-protocol), one day during the test and four days after. Muscle strength (MVC), muscle damage (CK), oxidative stress (GPx), inflammation (IL6) and volunteer-reported muscle soreness intensity were assessed pre and post exercise.

Results: Participants in the lemon verbena group benefited from less muscle damage as well as faster and full recovery. Compared to placebo, lemon verbena extract receiving participants had significantly less exercise-related loss of muscle strength (p = 0.0311) over all timepoints, improved glutathione peroxidase activity by trend (p = 0.0681) and less movement induced pain (p = 0.0788) by trend. Creatine kinase and IL-6 didn't show significant discrimmination between groups.

Conclusion: Lemon verbena extract (Recoverben®) has been shown to be a safe and well-tolerated natural sports ingredient, by reducing muscle damage after exhaustive exercise.

Trial registration: The trial was registered in the clinical trials registry (clinical trial.gov NCT02923102). Registered 28 September 2016.

Keywords: Aloysia citriodora; Exhaustive exercise; Glutathione peroxidases; Lemon verbena; Muscle soreness; Muscle strength; Recoverben®; Recovery; Sports nutrition; eiMD.

Conflict of interest statement

SBW, Pharmacist, PhD in Pharmaceutical Chemistry, over 20 years experience in the natural product industry for health and nutrition. Managing Director and head of R&D at Vital Solutions GmbH, Hausingerstrasse 6, Langenfeld, 40,764, Germany. IN, Dipl. Chemical engineer, Master in Natural product chemistry, Scientific Manager at Vital Solutions GmbH, Hausingerstrasse 6, Langenfeld, 40,764, Germany. CS (Dipl. Nutrition science) and CAR (PhD Sports science and examin. Biol.), both clinical research scientists at BioTeSys GmbH, a company with over 15 years experience in the field of nutrition research and clinical nutrition studies. ES, student of molecular nutritional science at University of Hohenheim and trainee at BioTeSys GmbH, Schelztorstrasse 54–56, Esslingen, D-73728, Germany. MW, professor for mathematics and statistics at the. Ulm University of Applied Sciences, Albert-Einstein-Allee 55, 89,081 Ulm, Germany.Ethical approval was obtained from the ethical committee of the “Landesärztekammer Baden-Württemberg” without concerns (F-2016-080 September 13th, 2016) prior to study start and all subjects signed the IRB-approved informed consent prior to any procedures.Not applicable.The study was sponsored by Vital Solutions GmbH. The sponsors contributed to discussion about study design and selection of outcome measures prior to study start. During study realization and data analysis all data were completely blinded and study realization, data analysis and report generating were undertaken independently by BioTeSys GmbH and Ulm University of Applied Sciences. Vital Solutions own the proprietary ingredient used in the study. The authors from BioTeSys GmbH and Ulm University of Applied Sciences declare that there is no conflict or interest regarding the publication of this paper.Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
Dispostion of subjects following Concort
Fig. 2
Fig. 2
Maximal voluntary contraction. Delta MVC [N] (Mean ± 95% CI; product effect: p = 0.0311) * indicating significance against baseline; & indicating significant group differeneces
Fig. 3
Fig. 3
Movement induced pain. Movement induced pain (VAS) [cm] (Mean ± 95% CI; product effect: p = 0.0788) * indicating significance against baseline
Fig. 4
Fig. 4
Retrospective pain. Retrospective pain [score] (Mean ± 95% CI; product effect: p = 0.7820) * indicating significance against baseline
Fig. 5
Fig. 5
Creatine kinase. Delta Creatine kinase [U/L] (Mean ± 95% CI; product effect: p = 0.9412) * indicating significance against baseline
Fig. 6
Fig. 6
Glutathione peroxidase. Delta Glutathione peroxidase [U/L] (Mean ± 95% CI; product effect: p = 0.0681) * indicating significance against baseline

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