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. 2018 Mar 1;13(3):290-299.
doi: 10.1093/scan/nsy009.

Sleep Quality and Adolescent Default Mode Network Connectivity

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Free PMC article

Sleep Quality and Adolescent Default Mode Network Connectivity

Sarah M Tashjian et al. Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Sleep suffers during adolescence and is related to academic, emotional and social behaviors. How this normative change relates to ongoing brain development remains unresolved. The default mode network (DMN), a large-scale brain network important for complex cognition and socioemotional processing, undergoes intra-network integration and inter-network segregation during adolescence. Using resting state functional connectivity and actigraphy over 14 days, we examined correlates of naturalistic individual differences in sleep duration and quality in the DMN at rest in 45 human adolescents (ages 14-18). Variation in sleep quality, but not duration, was related to weaker intrinsic DMN connectivity, such that those with worse quality sleep evinced weaker intra-network connectivity at rest. These novel findings suggest sleep quality, a relatively unexplored sleep index, is related to adolescent brain function in a network that contributes to behavioral maturation and undergoes development during adolescence.

Figures

Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.
PCC/precuneus seed (white) created in MNI space (8 mm3; x = 0, y = −52, z = 22) based on findings from Allen et al. (2011).
Fig. 2.
Fig. 2.
Regions of the DMN that demonstrate positive connectivity with the PCC/precuneus seed. Results were masked with the adolescent specific DMN mask from Sherman et al. (2014). *P < .05, corrected. Color bar indicates t intensity values. L, R = left and right hemispheres, A = anterior.
Fig. 3.
Fig. 3.
Regions of the DMN that demonstrate weaker connectivity with the PCC/precuneus seed as a function of poor sleep quality (PCA sleep component). *P < .05, corrected. Color bar indicates t intensity values. R = right hemisphere, A = anterior, P = posterior.
Fig. 4.
Fig. 4.
Visual depiction of the relation between PCA sleep component scores (poor sleep quality) and regions of the DMN that demonstrate weaker connectivity with the PCC/precuneus seed as a function of poor sleep quality (betas extracted using a binarized mask of significant voxels from the analysis including sleep quality component scores). N = 55.

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