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Comparative Study
, 10 (2)

Imbalanced Nutrient Intake in Cancer Survivors From the Examination From the Nationwide Health Examination Center-Based Cohort

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Comparative Study

Imbalanced Nutrient Intake in Cancer Survivors From the Examination From the Nationwide Health Examination Center-Based Cohort

Boyoung Park et al. Nutrients.

Abstract

This study was conducted to examine the nutrient intake status of cancer survivors. A total of 5224 cancer survivors, 19,926 non-cancer individuals without comorbidities (non-cancer I), and 20,622 non-cancer individuals with comorbidities, matched by age, gender, and recruitment center location were included in the analysis. Generally, the proportion of total energy from carbohydrates was higher and the proportion from fat was lower in cancer survivors. The odds ratios (ORs) for total energy (OR = 0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.86-0.99), proportion of total energy from fat (OR = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.35-0.83), and protein (OR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.79-0.90) were significantly lower, and the OR for the proportion of total energy from carbohydrates was higher (OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.10-1.33) in the cancer survivors than in non-cancer I. Additionally, the cancer survivors' protein, vitamin B₁, vitamin B₂, niacin, and phosphorus intakes were lower, whereas their vitamin C intake was higher. When divided by cancer type, the ORs for the carbohydrate percentages were significantly higher in the colon and breast cancer survivors, whereas protein intake was lower in gastric, breast, and cervical cancer survivors. The nutrient intake patterns in Asian cancer survivors are poor, with higher carbohydrate and lower fat and protein intakes.

Keywords: cancer survivors; high proportion of energy from carbohydrates; nutrient intake; undernutrition.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Flow chart of the study participants selection process.

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