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, 9 (1), 61-67

The Effects of Posterior Talar Glide and Dorsiflexion of the Ankle Plus Mobilization With Movement on Balance and Gait Function in Patient With Chronic Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial

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The Effects of Posterior Talar Glide and Dorsiflexion of the Ankle Plus Mobilization With Movement on Balance and Gait Function in Patient With Chronic Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Sang-Lim Kim et al. J Neurosci Rural Pract.

Abstract

Background: This study was to evaluate the effects of weight-bearing-based mobilization with movement (WBBMWM) on balance and gait in stroke patients.

Methods: Thirty stroke patients participated in this study. All individuals were randomly assigned to either WBMWM group (n = 15) or weight-bearing with placebo mobilization with movement group (control, n = 15). Individuals in the WBMWM group were trained for 10 glides of 5 sets a day, 5 times a week during 4 weeks. Furthermore, individuals in the control group were trained for 10 lunges of 5 sets a day, 5 times a week during 4 weeks. All individuals were measured weight-bearing lunge test (WBLT), static balance ability, timed up and go test (TUG), and dynamic gait index (DGI) in before and after intervention.

Results: The result showed that WBBMWM group and control group had significantly increased in WBLT, postural sway speed, total postural sway path length with eyes open and closed, TUG and DGI (P < 0.05). In particular, the WBMWM group showed significantly greater improvement than control group in WBLT, static balance measures, TUG, and DGI (P < 0.05).

Conclusion: Therefore, WBMWM improved ankle range of motion, balance, and gait in stroke patients. These results suggest that WBBMWM is feasible and suitable for individuals with a stroke.

Keywords: Balance; gait; mobilization with movement; stroke.

Conflict of interest statement

There are no conflicts of interest.

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