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, 9 (6), 7126-7135
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Milk/dairy Products Consumption and Gastric Cancer: An Update Meta-Analysis of Epidemiological Studies

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Milk/dairy Products Consumption and Gastric Cancer: An Update Meta-Analysis of Epidemiological Studies

Shuai Wang et al. Oncotarget.

Abstract

The relationship between dairy consumption and gastric cancer risk has not been well studied. We therefore performed a update meta-analysis to evaluate the relationship. Published cohort and case-control studies were identified via computer searches and reviewing the reference lists of the key articles. Random effects meta-analysis was used to pool effects from 5 cohort and 29 case-control studies. The odds ratio for the overall association between dairy consumption and gastric cancer was 1.20 (95%confidence interval: 1.04-1.39). The combined risk estimate was similar for population-based case-control studies (odds ratio = 1.27, 95%confidence interval: 1.00-1.61), but was reduced for hospital-based studies (odds ratio = 1.22; 95%confidence interval: 0.95-1.57) and cohort studies (odds ratio = 0.99; 95%confidence interval: 0.77-1.28). There was high heterogeneity in overall analyses. In the population-based subgroup analyses, the odds ratio was 0.96 (95%confidence interval: 0.69-1.34) when considering five studies assessing exposure two or more years before interview, and the association strengthened (odds ratio = 1.91, 95%confidence interval: 1.60-2.28) when dairy consumption was evaluated one year or less prior to interview. In conclusion, we found adverse effect of dairy consumption associated with gastric cancer.

Keywords: dairy products; epidemiological studies; gastric cancer; meta-analysis.

Conflict of interest statement

CONFLICTS OF INTEREST The authors have no financial interest in any product or concept discussed in article.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1. In overall studies, risk estimates of dairy consumption associated with gastric cancer
Figure 2
Figure 2. In those studies reported dairy and milk separately, risk estimates of gastric cancer associated with milk or dairy foods
Figure 3
Figure 3. A forest plot showing risk estimates from population-based case-control studies, estimating the association between gastric cancer and dairy consumption by different geographical regions
Figure 4
Figure 4. In population-based case-control studies, risk estimates of gastric cancer associated with different dairy consumption exposure period
NS: not specified; prior ≤ 1 y: evaluated dairy consumption one year or less prior to the interview; prior ≥ 2 y: evaluated dairy consumption two or more years prior to the interview.
Figure 5
Figure 5. Flowchart of study selection process
HR, hazard ratios; OR, odds ratio; RR, relative risk; CIs, confidence intervals.

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